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Full text of "Golden Legend"

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Where would a college be 
without students? Or, even 
more important, where would 
students be without a college? 
Life at Saint Leo involves meet- 
ing, growing and living with a 
wide variety of people and in- 
dividual personalities. Love- 
hate swings of emotion be- 
come not only a way of life but 
a method of living with room- 
mates, teachers and friends. In- 
terdependence and indepen- 
dence meet at an equilibrium 
point, when having an evening 
out with friends is just as impor- 
tant as receiving mail from 
home. 

College life fosters not only a 
desire to learn academically, 1 
but also to understand the 
spectrum of life-styles and the 
basic uniqueness of people. 
Whether sharing time or a beer, 
secrets or the Florida sunshine, 
the impulse to be with friends 
and family is motivation of a 
special kind. 

The photograph opposite: A 
group of friends gather on the 
College Mall to pose for the 
Golden Legend photographer. 



The patience comes in 
splurts — wailing for a ride, 
for a friend, or for nothing in 
particular. Registration lines 
and the Business office are 
often other points of inactivi- 
ty. And everyone knows 
what its like to try and cash a 
check on Friday. Studying 
requires quite a large 
amount of this virtue, not to 
mention a little will-power as 
well. 

The power comes in many 
shapes and forms Swim- 
ming, tennis, golf — these 
and other activities keep 
students busy and healthy. 
An electricity of sorts can be 
found on campus, an ener- 
gy which radiates in all its in- 
habitants. On the field, in the 
dorm or by the desk, an im- 
pulse to succeed is evident, 
and Saint Leo spirit shows! 



Photos 1 An impulse symbol 
jolts across the rear window 
of a student's VW. 2, Greg 
Cuke demonstrates a pho- 
tographer's patience. 3. A 
festival participant keeps a 
pensive vigil. 4. Hey, Big 
Guy — are we bothering 
you 9 5 The creature from 
the black lagoon— visiting 
Saint Leo poolside 9 6. This 
looks like Jineen Cronm 
swimming, but with her blue 
eyes closed, who knows for 
sure? 7 Slightly faded view 
of dorm life. 8, Momentum— 
f rat football in action 



4 




The pressure to excel in col- 
lege is an omnipresent prob- 
lem. There are deadlines to 
meet and papers to write, tests 
to take and projects to com- 
plete. Saint Leo students study 
wherever and whenever it's 
quiet (usually in the dorm hall or 
bathroom at 3:00 a.m.). There 
always exists the impulse to 
leave it all and head for the 
pool or into town with friends. 
For those who persevere and 
spend a few hours each even- 
ing engrossed in their work, the 
rewards are great; in the least, 
the effort brings a clear con- 
science. The last few weeks of 
each semester are generally 
the worst, when all the projects 
that were allowed to "slide" 
are finally due. Students take 
heart, however, for even as 
they burn out quicker than the 
midnight oil, they realize that 
relief is only an impulsive step 
away . . . 



1. Hey, Rich— we thought you 
were at the library (ha ha). 2. 
The ever-present economics 
text. 3. It must be term paper 
week again. 4. Someone takes 
time for a shady study session. 
(Can you say this ten times 
fast?) 5. Angie Hines and her 
typewriter moonlighting in the 
Saint Leo Hall "lounge." 6. 
Catalog drawer on the table— 
an indication of heavy re- 
search attempts. 7. Either Kris 
Warwick knows she's being 
watched or finance is a humor- 
ous subject (maybe both). 8. 
Study, write, study, study . , . 
Check your watch . . , study . . . 
leave . . . 




Saint Leo students are going 
places, literally. They're also 
conning from everywhere— 
dozens of American states, 
north and south, east and west. 
Native Floridians abound, mov- 
ing up from Miami or down from 
Tallahassee, Orlando, and 
Lakeland. 

Individuals from the Islands- 
Jamaica, Antigua, Bahamas, 
and Aruba— offer a spice and 
variety to everyday life with 
their diverse cultures. Foreign 
students arrive from as far 
away as Sweden or as close as 
Puerto Rico. 

The mixture of nationalities 
found at Saint Leo leads to a 
greater interest in travel and 
other life-styles. Friendships es- 
tablished during college years 
scale the miles through 
planned graduation trips and 
cruises. 

Although an impulse to "see 
the world" may be restricted 
to the U.S. or even the next 
town, Saint Leo students are 
going places ... No doubt 
about it! 

Photos opposite: The car of a 
Saint Leo student demonstrat- 
ing the unqiue impulse design. 
License plates of several cars 
which travelled a few miles to 
reach Leoland territory. 







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Decisions . . . decisions . . , 
Living in residence is an exper- 
ience not to be missed. Dorm 
life has always been synono- 
mous with college — a combi- 
nation of foot-loose indepen- 
dence and newly-acquired 
responsibility. Learning how to 
use an iron and washing ma- 
chine are part of the responsi- 
bility; dragging your roommate 
out of the hall after a trip to 
Ronnie's is the price of indepen- 
dence. 

Life at Saint Leo's is uniqu 
Each hall has a separate per- 
sonality composed of a gath- 
ering of individuals with singular 
lifestyles. One well-known ex- 
ample is St. Ed's Hall which pro- 
vides entertainment (in the 
form of Dolby stereo) for the 
College Mall, the tennis courts, 
the parking lot ... who ever 
said college can't be a cultural 
experience? 



Photos: 1 . Elizabeth Krivo crash- 
es for an afternoon snap 
(sleep-nap). 2. Steve Duffy 
eyes the camera at a "pri- 
vate" party. 3. Too much sleep 
last night? 4. A SLC student 
windsurfing on Lake Jovita. 5. 
Force X change in time equals 
impulse, 6. Doug Latino and 
Diane Whitaker take time out 
for a quiet conversation. 7. 
Those exciting early mornings! 
8. Lucky Dean Adams has his 
own telephone. 






How do Saint Leo students 
spend their idle nights? On im- 
pulse, everyone would say 
"the bar" (and, instinctively, 
this is a correct answer); how- 
ever, there are other activities. 
Plays, performances and rendi- 
tions are offered throughout 
the year— talented groups 
and individuals are thus ex- 
tended the opportunity to 
demonstrate how they spent 
their nights. 

Studying and relaxing are 
also common pastimes, but 
gathering with friends in the hall 
or piling in a car destined for 
Tampa more frequently sur- 
face in suggested plans. As 
they say, everyone lives for the 
weekend. At Saint Leo, every- 
one just lives . . . 



Photos: 1 . A night out for Phi Tau 
Omega. 2. That's Aliya Badch- 
kam "in the red" during saint 
Leo's International Night. 3. 
Candi Leverett in Wilde's "The 
Importance of being Earnest." 
4. Night life, for the campus 
scholars, is watching the high 
intensity light get so hot it fries 
the stereo. 5. A well-spent 
evening — long distance. 6. 
Sunglasses at night. 7. Pizza, 
self-explanatory. 8. Shell- 
shocked at the bar, also self- 
explanatory. 




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1 . Steve McGrath and Camille Urquhart discuss the refreshments 
at the SGA Day Barbeque. 2. Dr. Ackerman prays for a miss in the 
dunking machine. 3. Two freshmen assimilate the quiet pleasures 
of college life. 4. Tedious maneuvers by waterskiing entertainers. 
5. Eddie Corbett and Tim Robinson patiently wait their turn to 
"dunk" someone. 6. Rising above the noise and confusion below. 
7. A crowd of onlookers wait for the inevitable "splash." 









highlighted by good food, fun and 
company. Scheduled early in the 
school year, it was the perfect op- 
portunity for new and returning Leo- 
lites to become acquainted. Wa- 
terskiing, contests and a dunking 
machine were the major atten- 
tion—drawers for both faculty and 
students. When the sun began to slip 
away in the late afternoon, and as 
barbeque smoke drifted lazily across 
the lake, everyone agreed that "we 
might come next year too ..." Just 
on impulse, of course. 



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Jazzy. Energetic. Creative. The Fall Dance Concert was all 
of these and more. Based on the choreographic skills of 
Jacalyn Bryan, Lois Henry and the senior dance majors, the 
dance company and ensemble provided an evening of 
entertainment for everyone. Performers included: Jennifer 
Caniff, Jeanette DeCamp, Lori Fratarcangelo, LeAnne Gar- 
cia, Helen Henry, Lois Henry, Vaughnda Hilton, Evelyn Karafo- 
tias, Nina Lochridge, Linda Provencher, Lendrex Ross, Lisa 
Rudolf, Susi Schott, Karen Topp, Leslie Yalden. 



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In the spring, the Saint 
Leo Dance Company and ; 
Ensemble were back again 
with another exhibition of 
diverse talents. From 
choreography by Jacalyn 
Bryan, Lois Henry and 
Christine Forbes, to music 
by Ernie Williams and Larry 
Sledge, The concert was 
the culmination of hours of 
cooperation. Performers 
included: Jennifer Caniff, 
Helene Colon, Edward 
Corbett, Rosa Fernandez, 
Christine Forbes, Lori 
Fratarcangelo, Verna 
Garcia, David Gross, Aleda 
Henry, Helen Henry, Lois 
Henry, Vaughnda Hilton, Lyn 
Karafotias, Candace 
Leverett, Nina Lochridge, 
Kelly McClery, Kathy 
Phelan, Linda Provencher, 
Toni Restaino, Lisa Rudolf, 
Susi Schott, Karen Topp, 
Leslie Yalden. 



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1 Welcome to the London of 
Wilde's elusive character: Bun- 
bury. 2. Dr. Stenzel supports wom- 
en's suffrage with Candi Leverett. 
3. Flowers for Laura Richards. 4. 
Patrick Gallagher and Patrick 
Carse appear very "shiek," 5. An- 
tique transportation arrives via 
modern pick-up truck. 6. A male 
mannequin disguised as a suffrag- 
ette. 7. Dr. Prizeman and Eddie 
Corbett argue with the orators at 
the panel discussion of Wilde's The 
Importance of Being Earnest, 8. 
Could that be Dr. Ernie Williams 
standing out in the crowd? 



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1. Paul Hughes, Laura Richards, Mary 
Kowalski and Eddie Corbett. 2. (Front 
row, l-R) Angie Hines, Betty Ann O'Lone, 
Mary Kowalski, Candi Leverett, Kristi 
Fink, Laura Richards, (Back row, L-R) Jay 
Kennedy, Rich Scheicher, Paul Hughes, 
Eddie Corbett, Charles O'Lone, Ron 
Reisner and Jim Porto. 3. The final cur- 
tain. 4. Edward Corbett and Paul 
Hughes as Earnest and the Chaucible. 



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The Importance of Being 
Earnest 

The Cast 

Edward Corbett 

Paul Hughes 

Mary Kowalski 

Candace Leverett 

Kristi Fink 

Laura Richards 

Jay Kennedy 

Ron Reisner 

James Porto 

Director: Mr. David Frankel 

Set Design: Mr. Dennis Henry, 

Stagecraft and College 

Theatre classes. 




1 Paul Hughes as Creon. 2. Laura 
Richards as Antigone. 3. Lois Henry 
as the Queen. 4. Jay Kennedy, 
Ron Riesner and Ellen Fitzgerald as 
the chorus. 



The Cast 

Jay Kennedy 

Ron Reisner 

Ellen Fitzgerald 

Candace Leverett 

Paul Hughes 

Lois Henry 

Director: Mr. Dennis Henry 

Set Design: Stagecraft and 

College Theatre classes. 





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Director David Frankel 

Music Director John Higgins 

Vocal Director Larry Sledge 

Choreographer Jacalyn Bryan 

Set Design Dennis Henry 

Musicians . . . Murray Glass (Violin), 
Anthony Zaitz and Larry Sledge 
(Clarinets), Ken Brown and Sue Mul- 
lins (Trumpets), Larry Bucher (trom- 
bone), Penny Astrada and Elizabeth 
Krivo (Flutes), Jeff Abbott (Percus- 
sion), Robert Brust (Bass), John Hig- 
gins (Piano). 



34 




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Fiddler on the Roof 

The Cast 

Tevye Paul Hughes 

Golde Christine Baaden 

Tzeitel Kathleen Daugherty 

Model Candance Leverett 

Chava Betty Ann O'Lone 

Shprintze Ann Walford 

Bielke Aleda Henry 

Yente Mary Kowalski 

Motel Patrick Fleitz 

Perchik Edward Corbett 

Lazar Wolf John Vita 

Mordcha J. Rocker 

Rabbi James Porto 

Mendel Charles O'Lone 

Avrahm Greg Cason 

Nachum Steve McGrath 

Grandma Tzeitel Mary Kowalski 

Constable Steve ImMasche 

Fyedke Jay Kennedy 

Shaindel Lois Ann Alston 

The Fiddler Helen Henry 

Villagers J. McTague, M. Rahm, E. 

Fitzgerald 

Russians S. McGrath, J. Slupski 

Priest Jack McTague 

Two Boys D. Budd, J. Newlon 

Fruma-Sarah A. Walford, 

B. O'Lone, L. Alston. 




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1 . David Gross demonstrates his expertise with a martial arts 
weapon. 2. Vaughnda Hilton of the Karate club takes a defen- 
sive stance. 3. Karate club line-up. 4. The crowd is mesmerized 
by the show and the photographer. 5. A native Jamaican 
dance. 6. Entertainment from the Islands. 



36 





International Night was not an impulsive event, 
but the culmination of a week filled with carefully 
organized festivities. The evening included dances, 
skits, songs and dialogs which presented the 
cultural diversity of many countries. Saint Leo 
students from various areas — Antigua, the 
Bahamas, Jamaica— displayed the color and 
knowledge of their native lands. 

The performance concluded with a sampling of 
international foods and delicacies, followed by 
Calypso and Reggae music. 

The Fall Open House was only a prelude to a 
spectacular demonstration in the spring. Again 
the talent and impulsive drive of SLISA members 
was paraded on stage to the throngs of a 
"packed" house. 



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1 . Patty Mariner receives an "Out- 
standing Student" award from 
Secretary Helene Colon. 2. Newly 
elected SGA officers are sworn in: 
John Kaddouri (pres.), Helene Co- 
lon (vice-pres.), Elijah Knowles 
(treas.), and Karen Confrancesco 
(sec). 3. The transition of power is 
made smoothly. 4. Michael Rear- 
don congratulates Jamie Flem- 
ing. 5. A president's work is never 
done. 6. John Kaddouri addresses 
the banguet assembly. 7. Philip 
Ross stands tall as he receives his 
award. 



38 




The Student Government Association 
Awards Banquet was, as usual, a gala 
affair. Students and faculty alike caught 
the spirit of the banquet and impulsively 
responded to a desire to join others in a 
celebration of the year's achievements. 
Dedicated to Dr. Robert Ackerman, the 
banquet honored scholastic excellence 
as well as extracurricular involvement 
and accomplishment. Later in the 
evening, the newly elected SGA officers 
were sworn in — and as George Levins 
offered an Irish toast— the "chain of 
command" was passed along with 
dignity. 





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1 . A plaque, a program, certificates, 
and a half-empty coffee cup— re- 
mainders of a special evening. 2. 
CUB Pres. Bill Brown and Delta Epsilon 
Sigma officers Jennene Hendricks, 
Jami McLaughlin, and Wendy Le- 
doux enjoy their positions at the head table. 3. 
Dr. Hudson Reynolds and Mr. Chet Bogosta are 
grumbling, "They didn't even leave us any 
tips!" 4. Vice-Pres. Jennene Hendricks speaks 
of Dr. Southard's accomplishments at Saint 
Leo. 5. Students (and faculty members in the 
background) enjoy a rare chance to recog- 
nize academic excellence. 6. Elijah Knowles' 
smile says it all. 7. Paul Hughes receives a tricky 
certificate "hand-off" from Pres. Rick Lutz. 8. 
Dawn Heyes proudly glances at her certificate 
of membership in Delta Epsilon Sigma. 



40 





Scholastic excellence is an achievement that is 
sometimes overlooked as the year progresses. In an 
effort to focus some well-deserved attention on 
students who are committed to serious study, the 
Delta Epsilon Sigma National Honor Society 
sponsored its first annual Honor Banquet. Dedicated 
to Dr. Thomas B. Southard, the banquet served to 
recognize students who demonstrated superior 
accomplishments in their concentrations and in their 
general divisions. Incoming honor society members 
were also inducted during the banquet, giving the 
gathering a goal to reach in their labors 
for excellence. It certainly became 
apparent that high grades and 
achievements are not based merely on 
impulse— they are the products of 
patience and perseverence! 



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Residential life— a mixture of work and 
play, stress and success. A typical day on 
campus is usually anything but average; 
even the quietest hour is often besot with 
laughter or. activity. Such was the first cool 
day of fall, in November, as the 6:00 pm 
bell tolled and the sky darkened to a rosy 
bronze. Even after night fell, the "thonk" of 
tennis balls against raquet could be heard 
and at half past the hour a chorus of girls 
screamed in the college mall. A male 
voice (unidentified, but from the St, Ed's 
direction) shouted "Hey— cut that put!" 
and the girls screamed in reply. Another 
peaceful, unconventional evening in 
Leoland. 







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1. Relax— Don't do it! (we know what 
you're thinking). 2. Aerobics on third floor 
Henderson. 3. Bill Brown heading for his fa- 
vorite hideaway, St. Ed's Hall (just kidding 
Bill). 4, Candi Leverett, Leslie Yalden and 
Paula Capron "live it up" at a St. Leo Hall 
Halloween party. 5. Jerry Rocker prac- 
tices for the "big time." 6. John Canalizo 
and Ted "Wolfman" Violssi enjoy the 
movie from an unusual angle. 7. Dorm 
room philosophy. 8. Popcorn— a staple in 
every college student's diet. 9. The front 
desk doldrums. 10. Has Katie had a busy 
day? night? 



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Aon't straighten out 
the mess 
in my room... 

you'll confuse me 
and screw up my whole 
world 




is an all-or-none phenomenon. 



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Jamie Black 



Theresa Blais 
John Bohm 



Robert Bolduc 

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Robert Bradshaw 

Colleen Bresnan 

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Jacqueline Clark 
Marilyn Clarke 
Thomas Clarke 
Deanne Coffey 
Maureen Collins 



Robert Connerney 

Brian Connor 

Raymond Cook 

Christine Cooper 

Robert Cooper 



David Couch 
Jineen Cronin 

David Cross 
Robert Curran 

Jeffrey Daly 



Kathleen Dougherty 

Robert Davis 

Julia Dawson 

Lorna Dawson 

Jeanette DeCamp 



Thomas DellaRatta 

Jose DelSol 

Dean DeMar 

Nicola DeMercado 

Jeanne Denman 



Julie Dillon 

Michael Doolity 

Lance Dorsey 

Michael Drew 

Daniel Durkin 



Gary Dyer 

Cheryl Edwards 

Joseph Eitner 

John Elfring 

Paul Elliott 



Brett Elmblad 

John Elzeer 

Sherry Evanson 

Kathleen Farley 

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Hope Fernans 
Rebecca Fessenden 
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Patrick Fleitz 
Michael Flynn 
Jeffrey Fogarty 
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Donna Foote 
Robert Forrest 
Duane Fort 
Ann Foster 
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Christopher Fusco 
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Kathleen Goldbach 
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Kenneth Griffin 
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Elizabeth Jung 
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Steven Lauriston 
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Carl Lepera 
Michael Leporati 
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Mary Letcher 
Edward Licalzi 
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Mary Ellen Montana 

Brian Moore 

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Russell Murdaugh 

Margaret Murphy 

Mark Murphy 

Rosalie Murphy 



Elizabeth Myers 

Angel Navarro 

Tina Nemerof 

Kenrick Newton 

Cathy Oaks 





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Colin O'Connor 
Vincent Odierna 
James O'Donnell 
Robert O'Neill 



Patricia Ortega 
Leonard Paradise 
Sean Patt 
Brett Paul 
Anne Pearl 



Brian Pelski 
Marianne Perlick 
Kimberly Perry 
John Pesci 
Karen Pescitelli 



Kathy Pescitelli 
Kathleen Phelan 
Kimberly Pizzo 
Brian Powers 
James Powers 



Jeff Powers 
Kathleen Rahl 
Michelle Rahm 
Edward Raleigh 
Gary Randazzo 



Darrin Reichle 
Deborah Reiser 
Ruth Rhinesmith 



Laura Richard 
Gregory Ringlieb 
Jerry Robles 



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Monica Rodman 

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Michael Ross 

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Christopher Tierney 
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Johnny Vanderlinden 
Theodore Violissi 
Tasha Ward 
Cathleen Warwick 



Lori Washington 
Steven Wasieleski 
Jonathan Watts 
Carolyn Weiner 
Diana Weston 



Joanna Whiteside 
Gregory Wiita 
Michael Wilkie 
Todd Willhite 
Nicholas Wimmers 



Michael Works 
Arthur Young 
Victor Young 
Lisa Zaccagnini 
Lore Zahn 



Mario Zambrano 
Joseph Zemzicki 
John Zolezzi 
Stephen Zolezzi 
Jeff Zona 






Gillian Allen 

David Alley 

James Barnes 

Dornalyn Beazer 

John Benedetti 



Suzanne Bertels 

James Best 

Scott Bialy 

Claude Blandin 

Paul Bogensberger 



Maureen Boggs 
David Bondlow 



Andrew Boorman 
Patricia Borsanyi 



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Timothy Canniff 
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Kevin Good 

James Grady 




Danie! Graf 
Martha Greene 
Kathleen Groves 
Lori Guelfi 
Michael Gunn 



Michael Hall 
Michael Halula 
Stephen Hand 
Alicia Hasiak 
Christopher Hedden 



William Hoffman 
Colleen Hogan 



Sean Holman 
Robert Huetz I 



Anna Keene 
Kevin Keegan 
Rosalie Kelley 
Todd Kelley 
Timothy Kender 



John Kennedy 
Justine Kerssemakers 
Sophie Kerssemakers 
Mary Klimaitis 
Elijah Knowles 



Kristen Koloski 
Francis Kong 
Karol Kowalski 
Mary Kowalski 
Jeffrey Krafft 



Alfred Kurtz 

Daryl Landry 

James Landry 

Charles Langworfh 

Sharon Lawson 



Douglas Leclerc 

Jennifer Lee 

Ludwig Leito 

Brian Lesandro 

Candace Leverett 



Richard Liebchen 
Keith Lister 



Kathy Livingston 
Nina Lochridge 



Bryan Lucchesi 

Mark Lundy 

Leslie Magre 

Brigitte Major 

Jean Mancinelli 



Karen Manzi 

Suzanne Marchitto 

Rebekah Marshall 

Maria Martin 

Lori Maselli 



Timothy McCabe 
Glenn McCarty 
Bryan McDaniel 

Brian McDermott 
John McDonald 





Sean McDonald 
Thomas MacDonald 
Scott McGrory 
Kimberley McLain 
Nancy Maclellan 



Thomas McMenamin 
Tracy McMenimon 
Brian McMullen 
Gregory McMullen 
Nancy Meade 



Susan Mendrys 
Deborah Mercadante 
Julianne Merry 
Paul Mesgleski 
Donald Messer 



James Mooney 
Cindy Munnings 



Debra Munson 
Angela Napolitano 



Lynda Navratil 
John Nink 
Edward Noonan 
Glenda Norton 
Sean O'Connor 



Tracy O'Connor 
Mary Ogonowski 
Lori Oliva 

Betty Anne O'Lone 
Cathlyn O'Sullivan 




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Mary Schaad 
Andrew Schaller 
Suzanne Schulz 
Sarah Schuck 
Eduardo Simas 



James Skakel 
Steven Skehan 
Shelia Speth 
Ann Strong 
Anya Symmonett 



Lynnette Tamburello 
Franz Tedrowe 
Timothy Tenke 
John Thomas 
Mark Thomas 



Scott Tumelty 
Arlene Uter 
John Vita 
John Walsh 
James Walyus 



Kristen Warwick 
Christopher Weber 
David Wendler 



Robert White 
Rebecca Wiegand 
Kevin Wilson 



Francis Wynne 
Christopher Zima 
Victoria Zima 



Marion Ahalt 

Scott Anderson 

Joanna Apfl 

Christine Baaden 

Aliya Badchkam 



Marisa Bajandas 

Marcus Baker 

Robert Bannon 

Jill Bordonaro 

Catherine Brehmer 



Talmon Brice 
Sylvia Brookins 



Michael Brown 

Robert Burch 

Brian Burke 

Brian Cairns 

Jennifer Canalize 




Aletha Brooks 
Kristy Brown 



pW'MO'RS 



William Cancroft 
Ronda Carman 
Patrick Carse 
Helena Carter 
Kim Cassar 



James Castro 
Christian Catanoso 
Audrey Cate 
Jon Clanton 
George Clarke 



Rob Clement 
Helene Colon 
Robert Condon 
John Corsi 
Matthew Coyne 



Gregory Cuke 
Christine Cunningham 
Maura DeFloria 
Marcia Dirks 
Theresa Dozier 



Mark Duford 
Juan Echeverria 
William Edson 
Peter Farley 
Regina Fitzgerald 



M clyn Gero 

pry Gilmore 

Paul Glowacki 

Pfiscilla Gostkowski 

Clay Grant 



Thomas Freer 

Gail Fulton 

Anne-Marie Gall 

Lisa Gaudette 

Danielle Gerardi 



Todd Grift 

Ian Guy 

Elizabeth Hagaman 

Maureen Hartig 

Kelly Hazinski 



Michael Henriauez 

Scott Higgs 

James Hollingsworth 

Karl Holman 

Hortencia Alexander 



Christopher Hoverkamp 

Jeffrey Irwin 

Stephan Jannuzzo 

Stephanie Johns 

Flavea Jones 



h Kaddouri 

Evelyn' Karafotias 

Christopher' Karamitsos 

Thomas Keeley 

Moira Koiiy 





Denise Kenworthy 
Ursula Kirnes 
Barbara Koessler 
William Kornig 
Patricia Krop 



Mark Kubacki 
John Lachance 
Adolfo Laffite 
Darrell Lamoureux 
Thomas Lee 



Laurianne Leonard 
Frederick Lesswing 
Paul Lewis 
Brian Locklin 
Carla Lombardo 



Kevin Lopiccolo 
Mary Lunkes 
Donald Lyew 
Ann Mahon 
Patrick Mahon 



1 *l ! 


Stacie Mann 


Mario Marichi 




Stanley Mathis 


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Jorge Mayoral 


Mary Beth McBurney 


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Audrey McCoy 




Brien McCue 


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Steven McGrath 




James McKendrick 




Jami McLaughlin 



Laurie McPherson 
Ronald Mendleski 
John Menichini 
Eric Meyer 
Mary Meyer 



Colleen Modica 

Patricia Mulkerin 

Sue Mullins 

Patricia Murphy 

Michael Murray- 



Roberto Muvdi 

Stephen Odierna 

Hugh O'Donnell 

Charles done 

Daniel Olson 



Gretchen Otis 

Henry Pacella 

Cesar Padilla 

Laura Pasquini 

Sandra Pendarvis 



Ralph Perez 
Karen Petitt 



Audrey Pottinger 
James Powers 



Patrick Powers 

David Purpi 

Antoinette Rahming 

Maureen Reed 

Ronald Reisner 



Catherine Renz 
Nigel Richards 
Nicole Roberts 

Sharon Roberts 
Eileen Robson 





Debbie Rogers 
Eileen Romanowski 
Jane Ross 
Philip Ross 
Christine Rottmund 



Cynthia Roughley 
Natalie Rudravajhala 
John Ruffing 
Theresa Rutty 
Vickie Salge 



Leah Saker 

Steve San Giovanni 



Theodore Sanson 
Charles Santoro 



Lori Scagliarini 
Naira Scheper 
Sandra Schoren 
Robert Schultz 
Robert Sheehan 



David Siefker 
James Silverwood 
John Simas 
Robert Simas 
Philip Simonsen 



Keith Slupski 
Melissa Smith 
Lisa Spaulding 
Michael Stanfield 
Patrice Strachan 



k . *J 



Jfeylor 
. teqgue 
pries Testa 
Dwayne Thwaites 
Mary Ellen Traub 



Michael Trilla 

Todd Tustin 

Camille Urquhart 

Carol Uter 

Jacqueline Uter 



Mark Volterre 

Carmen Van den Hombergh 

Anothony Varallo 

Allyson Vasta 

Maria Viola 



Jonathon Walker 

David Warwick 

Jozef Wever 



Diane Whitaker 

Kevin White 

Heather Whitney 



Whyte 
dfd 



Susan ^Ylriger 




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People make the difference at S.L.C. It is the individual, in his 
own way, who adds his special talents and personal flair to the 
college community. 

Photos: 1 . Vaughnda Hilton, Camille Urquhar, and Verna Gar- 
cia "relax" on their off-hours. 2. An ROTC student boldly takes 
the plunge. 3. A familiar sight. 4. The walk to class can some- 
times be fun. 5. The backstage instrument panel in the S.L.C. 
theatre. 6. Goalie John Murphy makes flying look easy. 7. Mem- 
bers of the Antigone chorus hide behind modern masks. 8. 
Dawn Atallian catches some "rays" on a bright afternoon. 9. 
The London Festival attracted the attention of big and little 
"kids" alike. 
















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^resident 




T? 


las B. Southard 


Early mornings. Long meetings. Pressures, problems, the "public eye." Dr. 
Thomas B. Southard has known these and more for 14 years as Saint Leo's fifth 
president. The Golden Legend staff joins with the campus body to salute Dr. 
Southard's service during the past years. Retiring this year, Dr. Southard will 
close an important chapter of the College's history and growth. 






78 



Message from Dr. Southard 

Saint Leo College means many things to many people. To some it has meant four years of vigorous study. To some it has meant maturing in faith. To some 
it has meant athletic contests and fun. To some it has meant expression in the arts. To some it has meant experience in leadership. To all it has meant many true 
and lasting friendships. 

The Golden Legend yearbook staff has attempted to incorporate all of these meanings into this book- I believe they have done well. 




79 



Dr. Robert Gould 
Vice President, Academic Affairs 




Allan Powers 

Vice President, Public Affairs 




^^K^ 




V 




Jane Ketcham 

Secretary, Academic Affairs 



Beth Evans 

Secretary to the President 



80 



Dr. Robert Ackerman 

Vice President, Student Affairs 







'ipwi**"""' % 




Dr. Walter Williams 

Dean of the College 




Robert Richmond 

Vice President, Business Affairs 








Kathy Britton 

Secretary, Student Affairs 



* 




Shelby Buchanan 

Secretary to the Dean 




Martha Fountain 

Secretary, Business Affairs 



81 



ROTC: Major Charles Gibbs, Marion Ruffing (secretary), SFC Ronnie Strick- 
land. 




Purchasing: Judy Hutchinson, Karen Hatfield. 




(5 






' 



\y 







Alumni Affairs: Cheryl Townsend, John Fiengo (director), Nancy Pond, Ethel 
Siffringer, Janice Wagenfohr. 




Public Affairs: Thelma Clark (secretary), Joy Shep- 
herd, Seppie Allan. 



82 



Records: Patty Montgomery, James Christiansen (regis- 
trar), Diane Passannante, Annette Duggan. 




Military Education Program: Virginia Cimorelli, Donna Denney, Donna 
Clark, Teri Cuthbert. 





Educational Services: Doris Watson, Jeanette Devine (secretary), 
Angie Perez, Lucille Snider, Ed LaChance (Dean), Fred Colby. 



Admissions: Br. Michael Josvanger, O.S.B., Katherine Schuma, 
Sara Eagle, Erma Holmes, Kathy Barthle, Laura Beagles. 



83 



Financial Aid: Vicki Ferguson, Marsha Hummerick, Alice Furney, 
Paulette Pospishil, Victoria Musielak, Elizabeth Maguire (director). 




Business Affairs: Joyce McNatt, Charles Von Horn, Roy 
Hutto. 



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Business Office: Tippi Curry, Sherry Smith, Joyce Warren, Frances Elwell. 




Director of Institutional Research: Dr. George 
Kuehn. 



84 



Director of Residential Life: Sr. Mary Clare Neuhofer, 
O.S.B. 




Library professionals: Sr. Dorothy Neuhofer, O.S.B. (director), Albert Spencer, 
Elizabeth Tesar, Kay Kosudo. 






Residential Directors: Lajean Grigsby, Keith Kramer. 







Library: Margaret Neuhofer, Mikki Carr, Georgina Baker, Norman 
Carey, Jo Ann Cook, Delores Hust, Alice Burger, Eldora Maguire. 



85 



Academic Computer Services: Chester Bogosta, Susan 
Kaye. 



Duplicating: Michael Hines, Josephine Shafchuk, Sr. Mildred Gelis. 






I i 



Campus Store: John Grief, Linda Frassrand, Janice Christiansen, 
Karen Fadling, Nancy Smith. 




Campus Life: Michael Capece, Debbie Thompson (Nurse), Cin- 
dy Smith, Tim Wise (counseling). 



86 



Data Processing: Judy Barthle, Linda Blommel, Pat Thompson, Marcie Ferrell. 




Post Office: Diane Grant, Sandy Harvey. 






•* « 





**».',. -^-«^----'' ~i . 



Security: Bob Helms, Gwen Robbins, Barbara Lewellen, Lynn Hancock; Ray Whi- 
taker, Bill Robinson, K.C. Lowery, Bob Zerbe, David Shanahan, Tracy Snider, 
Chris Spivey, Don Padgett, Bob Bloomhuff. 



Inter-office Mail: Reo Weaver. 



87 



Grounds: Anderson Merchant, Glenn Gulvin, Randy Lethco, Ray- 
mond Davis, Steve Benson, Carl Mears, Marcus Baker. 



Housekeeping: Hercules Hicks, Argon Roberts, Henry Hicks, 
Willie Braddford, Willie Glover. 





PLANT 

OPERATIC 
BUILD I r 5 





Housekeep.ng: Mattie Oates, William Hanner, E 
Ross. 



mma 



Plant Operations: Marshall Tustin, Earnest Mabry, Gordon Briggs, Mitchell 
Martin, Jim Doner, John Hutchinson, Tom Cantrell, Dewey Champion, 
Jackie Jackson, Raymond Card. 



Humanities 




Stephen Immasche, Dr. Mark Edmonds, Dixie Higgins (academic advisor), Kurt Van Wilt. 

Dr. Thomas Brown, Dr. Herbert Prizeman, Dr. J. Edward Woodard, Maura Snyder, Ralph 
Pendexter, Dr. Walter Poznar, Dr. Dirk Budd (chairman). 

Shirley Howarth, David Frankel, Lois Henry, Thomas Abrams, O'Neil Phillips, Carolyn O'Lone 
(secretary), Alma Coston (secretary). 



David Frankel: "Love the art in yourself, not yourself in the art.'' (Constantin Stanislavsky) 

Lois Henry: "Keep dancing." Ralph Pendexter: "The game, as it were, plays itself." (Jonathon Swift) 



Mireya Koopman: "To dream the impossible dream 
(Cervantes) 



Ed Woodard: "On the golf course, profanity is never gratuitous." 
Thomas Brown: "Only the curious have, if they live, a tale worth telling at all." (Alastair Reid) 



89 



Education 




Dr. Lucille Fuchs (chairperson) 
"Attitude is everything." 



Maggie Danermine (secretary) 

Dr. Sara Thrash 

"He who laughs, lasts. 



Dr. Marilyn Schaeffer 

"Trust yourself." 



Philosophy 8C Theology 



Dr. James Erpenbeck 

"Zounds!" 
Dr. Ernie Williams 
'If you know the meaning of life, thank a philosophy teacher. 
Dr. Tyson Anderson 
"God doesn't have a secretary." (Wallace Black Elk) 
Margaret Thompson (secretary) 
Dr. Eileen Stenzel 




91 



Social Science 







Dr. Stephen Kane 

"Lose your mind and come to your senses." (Fritz Perls) 

Dr. Maribeth Durst 

"The quality of an institution is measured by the students it 
graduates." 

Dr. James Horgan (chairman) 

"I hope you have learned to think critically in your years here. 
Don't be too quick to swallow foolishness. Don't be cynical 
either. Just try to be thoughtful as you make your way through 
life." 

Dr. John McTague 

"Life is like a can of tunafish — sometimes it's good, sometimes 
it's not so good." 

Frances Martin 

"Love is like a mirror. When you love another you become his 
mirror and he becomes your's . . . and reflecting each other's 
love you see infinity." (Leo Buscaglia) 

Dr. Nancy Gunter 

"One can only do one's best, the rest remains to chance and 
circumstance." 



Terry Danner 

"Live fast. Die young. Leave a good-looking corpse." 

Dr. Hudson Reynolds 

"The question after all, if it be a question, is, whether litera- 
ture, ancient as well as modern, does not assist a good under- 
standing, improve natural good taste, add polished armor to 
native strength, and render its possessor, not only more capable 
of deriving private happiness from contemplation and reflec- 
tion, but more accomplished also for action in the affairs of life, 
and especially for public action." (Daniel Webster) 

Dr. Richard Bryan 

"Play hard but work hard too. Don't forget to enjoy the 
present, but don't forget to plan for a future that you can enjoy 
even more." 

Alan Merson 

"Continue to think, analyze, and most importantly, question." 

Margit Chipman (secretary) 

Dr. Joseph Cernik 

"The skills I have emphasized throughout all of my courses — 
critical reading, analytical thinking and clear writing — are skills 
which will continue to benefit you throughout life. Use them 
wisely." 



Business 




Dr. Roger Smith 
William Foley 

Betty Miller 



T. Lynn Wilson 
John Todd 
Doris Camper (secretary) 



Daniel Gibney 

Dr. Marvin Travis 

(chairman) 

Harry Purchase 



Charles Fisk 
Robert Rubin 

Daniel Dwyer 



Robert Rubin: "Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there." 

Lynn Wilson: "Would you be very upset if I asked you to take your silly- questions down the hall?" 

Chuck Fisk: "The opportunity cost is an opportunity lost." 

Bill Foley: "Whatever you do, don't double Hud!" 




- 



ence 8C Mathematics 





Brian Nereim, Dr. Setty Adisesh, Dr. Jeanne Wright 

Dr. Burt Rosenbaum, Pat Cooper (secretary), Richard Endress 

Dr. Robert Peterson (chairman), F. Carl Miller, Dr. George Dooris 

Carl Miller: "Be never completely satisfied — always move forward." 



Robert Peterson: "All men naturally desire to know." 

(Aristotle) 



Jeanne Wright: "Keep dreaming, keep believing, and keep a rainbow in your heart." 



George Dooris: "First, do no harm!" 



Burt Rosenbaum: "No man is an island; life's burdens become lighter if they can be but shared. 



Setty Adisesh: "Nothing is lost when money is lost, something is lost when health is lost, and everything is lost when character is lost." 



Physical Education 



Norm Kaye: "The toughest part of being good is having to prove it every day." 

Gary Richert: "Dumb coaches and smart players will beat dumb players and smart coaches every time." 

Mike Marshall: "Sit on a fast ball, center it, put a charge in it, see ya!' 




Dr. Michael Marshall, Ernest Baumes, Arlene Fannin (secretary), Thomas Phillips 
Gary Richert, Paula Smith, Norman Kaye (chairman), John Smart 



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1985 was a very productive and impul- 
sive year for Saint Leo's AMA chapter. 
Three students went to Manitoba, Can- 
ada to complete the final phase of an 
international marketing competition 
sponsored by the University of Manitoba. 
Patty Mariner, Don Marryshow, and Frank 
Charles returned to Saint Leo with top 
honors in four areas. Working against 26 
teams, the students placed #1 upon 
completion of play exercise, #1 in indus- 
try standings, #1 in final standing among 
U.S. teams, and third overall. 

The AMA chapter for 1985 included 
members— (above)— Carmen Van den 
Hombergh, Stephan Odiema, Dave Hob- 
son, Kathleen Beyer, Patrick O'Loughlin, 
Sharon Lawson and Rafael Dolagaray. 
(opposite) Dave Hobson and his impres- 
sion of the all-American hero "Super-Mar- 
keter"— leading our nation's economy to 
new heights of success. 







98 





Ac • count • ing n 1 : the system of record- 
ing and summerizing business and finan- 
cial transactions in books and analyzing, 
verifying and reporting the results. It 
sounds tough, and it is. Ask anyone who 
has taken The Principles of Accounting 
and be prepared for an extended sigh, a 
heavy, glazed look and a generally fa- 
tigued expression. If these are qualities 
you've been searching for, drag out your 
friendly neighborhood accountant (who's 
probably at the bank making a deposit), 
and hope he's (or she's) a Saint Leo gra- 
duate — you'll be assured of impulsive 
quality. 

This years members include — (no mon- 
ey or applause please, just send adding 
machines)— (above, Top)— John Biver, 
Thomas Stineman, Paul Glowacki, Ken 
Taylor, Robert Manning, Josef Wever. 
(Bottom)— Rebecca Summers, Maria Lisa 
Palermo, Helene Colon, Lisa Gaudette, 
Sandra Pendarvis, Cheryl Hill, (opposite) 
Rebecca Summers — Vice President, San- 
dra Pendarvis— Social Director, Maria Lisa 
Palermo — President. 



99 



K. 



VIC 




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The Saint Leo College Knights of Colum- 
bus were established on November 22, 
1964. The original chapter initiated its 
charter with 50 members. Although mem- 
bership has decreased in subsequent 
years, impulsive quality and the desire to 
support mankind has not wavered. 

Members— (above, back row)— Fran- 
cis Wynne, Paul Glowacki, Stephan Duffy, 
(front row)— Jozef Wever, Robert Coo- 
per, Karl Homan. (above) Father Kelly at 
Mass. (opposite) Saint Leo metal sculp- 
ture reaches out. 




* ■ 





Where do they find the energy? Circle- 
K'er's are everywhere — on campus, at 
social functions, attending conventions — 
and especially helping others. The group's 
specialty is raising funds for underprivi- 
leged children, and through this action 
they exhibit the care and consideration 
that's characteristic of Saint Leo College. 

Members — (above, back row) — 
Dwight McLeod, Michael Murray, Bill Hut- 
tig, Karl Homan, Rodney Murray, Erica 
Smith, Elijah Knowles, George Clarke, Eric 
Godet. (middle)— Alphanette Francis, 
Kim Cassar, Collona Hepburn, Antoinette 
Rahming, Rochelle Sands, Wayde Cart- 
wright, (front)— Cindy Johnson, Glenda 
Norton, Gillian Allen, Keva Ellis, Kamal 
Adeni. 




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Karate appears to Pe one of the most 
impulsive cluPs of all ... a flash of move- 
ment accompanies split-second deci- 
sions . . . skill, motion, speed . . . 

MemPers— (above)— Camielle Urqu- 
hart, Verna Garcia, Mike Verder, 
Vaughnda Hilton, Sandra Pendarvis, Ron- 
gele Peters, (opposite)— Vaughnda Hil- 
ton in action, (above) Club members 
take a definitive stand. 





The Saint Leo College Campus Ministers 
have experienced a busy and impulsive 
year— planning conferences, attending 
conventions, organizing retreats and ex- 
peditions. Throughout each semester 
they grew in fellowship and mutual re- 
spect . . . together . . . 

Members— (above)— Mary Ellen Burke, 
Rongele Peters, Sharon Lawson, Karl Hol- 
man, Donna Holmes, Greg Kent, Moira 
Kelly, Ken Taylor, Wendy Ledoux, Sandi 
Schoren. 






103 













"Resident Halls." Some students cringe 
when the phrase is mentioned. Others, like 
the members of Saint Leo's Resident Hall 
Association, seem to thrive on this major 
experience in independant living. To 
keep the system running smoothly while 
managing a menagerie of rambunctious 
college students is no easy task — but pa- 
tience, persistence and a sprinkle of im- 
puslive decision-making gave this year's 
group a powerful advantage. 

(above) — Carla Lombardo, Sandi 
Schoren, Lisa Gaudette, John Kaddouri, 
Rebecca Summers, Bill Huttig, Raymond 
Allen, Toni Restaino. 

(opposite) A moment frozen in time at 
Saint Edward's Hall. 



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Supporting the RHA is another organiza- 
tion — one which quells student impulse by 
"laying down the law." The Residential Ju- 
dicial Board reviews infractions of the liv- 
ing code and brings justice to the halls of 
Saint Leo. Throwing popcorn out of build- 
ing windows and setting off the fire alarm 
are activities not appreciated by this 
group— but they are understanding and 
fair to all concerned. So before you roll 
that keg upstairs, remember you may 
soon be seeing . . . 

(above)— 1st Row— Denise Kenworthy, 
Elijah Knowles, Heather Whitney, Wade 
Cartwright, Cathem Dion, Scott Ander- 
son. 2nd Row— Phillip Davis, Toni Restaino, 
Aubrey Rudd, Helene Colon, Adolpho La- 
fiete, Maria Lisa Palermo, 
(opposite) The Executive Board— Phillip 
Davis— Co-Chairperson, Helene Colon- 
Chairperson. 



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Student officers represent 
the ideas and suggestions of 
each class generation. They 
are elected to serve and uti- 
lize their position as a pivot 
point for the views of each 
contingency. Senior Class 
officers for this year were— 
(left top)— Gregory Kent, 
Toni Restaino, Rene Hazink 
Serving the Junior Class 
were — (right top) — Toni 
Restaino, Lisa Gaudette, Jill 
Bordonaro, Sandi Schoren. 
Sophomore Class officers 
were — (left bottom) — 
Kathy Pescitelli, Patrick Gal- 
lagher, Elizabeth Ellison. 
Freshman Class officers in- 
cluded— (right bottom)— 
Robert Cooper, Dean Ad- 
ams, Colleen Bresnan, Ellen 
Fitgerald. 




106 




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107 



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Rugby is not Soccer. The two sports are 
constantly confused, yet rugby is rougher, 
tougher, and slightly more dramatic. The 
game originated as a British version of 
American football and involves continu- 
ous play, kicking, dribbling, lateral passing 
and tackling. Impulsively, only the stron- 
gest join and survive . . . thus this year's 
team was a powerful contender. 







The Honor Banquet . . . brass and green 
metallic plaques flash with impulsive honor 
as they reflect the soft ceiling light in their 
recipients' hands. Delta Epsilon Sigma as a 
National Honor Society fosters a regal ap- 
preciation of academic excellence. 

Members included— (above, back) — 
Dr. J.E. Woodard, James Silverwood, 
chael Ladwig, Rick Lutz, Rebecca Sum- 
mers, Robert Manning, Luz Muvdi, Dwight 

cLeod. (front)— Kamal Adeni, Jami 

cLaughlin, Wendy Ledoux, Donna 
Gwynn-Lutz, Opal Buchanon, Stuart Lock- 
lin. 






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James "Out 
of My Head" 
Porto, one of 
the Monarch's 
regular colum- 
nists, pictured 
here with his al- 
ter ego and 
the main char- 
acter of his col- 
umns, Otto 
Penguist. Porto, 
in case you're 
confused, is the 
individual with 
black hair. 



Michael Lad- 
wig, another 
regular colum- 
nist featured by 
the Monarch is 
depicted here 
at home in the 
laboratory , 
creating a cure 
for that com- 
mon Saint Leo 
affliction — sun 
poisoning. 



BOOK 




STUDEM 
PUBUCKTH 

|r~ HEWSPAPef 

itioldmljq 

YEARBOOI 



Liz and Doug engage in a v> hot- 
n-heavy" discussion concern- 
ing the particulars of a future 




Editor Elizabeth Krivo 




It's 3 a.m. While most of the campus settles in and sleeps, a basement light 
seeps through bottle-glass windows and casts a shadow on the stair. Inside a 
few weary-eyed Monarch editors work frantically to meet an early dead- 
line. The evening (or morning) ends with some quick slashes from an exacto 
knife and a thin layer of hot wax. Waving farewell to the Golden Legend 
Yearbook staff editors, (whose endurance knows no bounds), the Monarch 
staff shuffles up the stairs, ready to spin a new edition off the morning press. 

Members pictured above are— Michael Ladwig, Andy Phillips, Mike 
Verder, Bill Gallgher, Sara Smith. Those not shown include— Rosalie Murphy, 
Kevin Sawyer, Kris Karamitosos, Greg Kent, Mike McDonnell, Doug Latino 
(Editor), Kevan Bethel, Elizabeth Krivo (Editor), James Porto. 



Aonarch edition, 
ids! 



Good luck, 





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Jamaica. Sweden. The Virgin Islands. 
Puerto Rico. Belize. The Bahamas. Anti- 
gua. England. "International" is a word 
which describes the aura students exper- 
ience while watching a SLISA Open 
House, or listening to a member speak 
about his or her native land. Becoming 
familiar with the world is an essential part 
of any education, and Saint Leo offers a 
unique method of gaining this knowledge 
through the impulsive insight of . . . 
(above, back)— Dwight McLeod, Kamal 
Adeni, Kim Cassar, Karl Holman, Collona 
Hepburn, Sharon Lawson, Anya Symon- 
ette, Flavea Jones, Rongele Peters, Timo- 
thy Lovett, Sandra Pendarvis, Dwayne 
Thwaites, Erica Smith, Rodney Murray, 
Jimmy Hendricks, Clarence Maxwell, 
(front)— Ian Guy, Sean Holman, Marcia 
Dirks, Paulette Guy, Talmon Brice, Audrey 
Pottinger, Althea Byam, Terrence Chal- 
lenger, Mohn Capozzi. 







\N3CSI 






112 




Organization. Action. Any impulsive ac- 
tivity needs the supervision of the Saint 
Leo Campus Union Board . . . 

Members shown above include — 
(back)— Dave Hobson, Greg Kent, Pat- 
rick Hannigan, Kristi Fink, Martha Matta. 
(front) — Danielle Gerard, Christine 
Shaughnessy, Tracy McMenamin, Opal 
Buchanon. 

(opposite) President Bill Brown graduates, 
(above) Kristi Fink, CUB member, partici- 
pates in the London Festival Play. 



7^e 646t£dea *&e&e*tct 




Editor Chris Cunningham 




Editor Steve McGrath 



A few words on the yearbook . . . I'm 

tired, let's go home. Why are we here? 
Are we ever going to leave? I have the 
worst headache. OK kids, let's get going 
here. Where are the pica rulers? Has 
newspaper taken our liquid paper 
again? You call Belle Simmons. No, you 
call her! Where's the darkroom key? Help 
Seppie . . . your editors have been kid- 
napped! Time to work, now, no more 
wasting time. This cropper is warped. Mr. 
Cobb, we've heard this before. Why is 
the enlarger burning our photos? Only 
200 pages to go. Jami's in the abyss. The 
typewriter only prints half letters. I can't 
believe we're still here. Who are these 
people and who cares? Can we call it a 
night? Let's clean this office, for real this 
time. It's tough at the top. We're great 
and we know it. Where's Steve? Why 
hasn't he written? Hey campers — How's 
tricks? I can't believe it, we're almost fin- 
ished. What time is it? 2:30 a.m.? Time 
flies . . . Why don't we have a staff? 
There it's done — almost! Congratula- 
tions Golden Legend Staff on an excep- 
tional year!! . . . Good luck next fall! Next 
Fall? Wait a minute . . . 





114 




NEW YORK 



On March 13, 1985, members of the Golden Legend Year- 
book and Monarch Newspaper staffs departed from Tampa 
Airport for a national convention in New York City. These 
individuals were: Photography Ecitor Jami McLaughlin, Lay- 
out Editor Steven McGrath, and Copy Editor Christine Cun- 
ningham of the yearbook, traveling with Co-Editors Elizabeth 
Krivo and Doug Latino of the Monarch. The following is an 
account of their journey, beginning at / l / l:56 p.m. Tuesday, 
March 12, the evening before departure. 

1 1 :56 pm, Tuesday, March 12. Chris and Jami (of the year- 
book) are frantically attempting to catch up on all their 
studies before the trip. Jami has two papers due and Chris is 
studying for a test. Can they get everything done and pack 
before the 5:00 am departure time? 

12:00 am, Wednesday, March 13. Jami mutters "It's mid- 
night and I have two stinking paragraphs written!" No mir- 
acles here, folks , . . 

5:10 am: Wednesday, March 13. Jami, Chris, Liz and Doug 
wait at Security for the van. Doug brought more luggage 
than anyone and even stuffed a typewriter in his suitcase. 
Chris and Jami have been up all night! 

7:30 am, Wednesday, March 13. We have been airborne 
for 20 minutes. Seppie barely made the flight! First, a stop- 
over in North Carolina then on to the Big Apple. P.S. A large 
group of rowdy high school students join our flight. They yell 
something about a convention in NYC— we hope not the 
same one we're attending! 

10:00 am, Wednesday, March 13. Arrived at La Guardia — 
What a city! 

4:03 p.m. Wednesday, March 13. Checked into the hotel 
and decided to take a tour of the UN building. Got caught in 
a boring meeting about UNESCO (of which the US is no long- 
er a member). Jami and Chris fell asleep during the film and 
Seppie, Steve and Liz sneaked out the back. 

6:00 pm, Wednesday, March 13. After dinner Chris, Doug, 
Liz and Steve hopped a cab to Greenwich Village where 
they toured 42nd Street, NYU, Times Square, Broadway and 
the drug dealers of Washington Street, Took the Subway at 
11:00 pm back to the hotel. 

8:50 am, Thursday, March 14. Steve Bell of "Good Morning 
America" heads a table in the Doral Ballroom. He speaks of 
journalistic integrity: "It is time for the journalist to do some 
soul-searching, and it should be." 

10:00 am-5:00 pm, Thursday, March 14. Meetings . . . 
Meetings . 

12:00 am, Thursday, March 14. Sleep after sightseeing. 

12:00 am, Friday, March 15. After a day of meetings and 
sights, just returned from the World Trade Center. What a 
view! The entire city in lights. We also saw a filming of a 
police program with Carol O'Connor. 

11:30 pm, Saturday, March 15. Arrived at Tampa Air- 
port—no College van in sight! Doug calls Security— "Collect 
call to anyone from students at Tampa Airport waiting for a 
ride." They accepted, A very tired group wait for the van to 
arrive— our last glimpse of New York was a beautiful horizon 
line with the Empire State building glowing green against an 
orange, pink and neon blue sky . . . We'll be back! 



115 




F A E Z H I K A M 



N S O II P 2 T Y * X Y O 




B^nBHIMRMMRHHHBiiRHHRwuT^^^JMb 




^^tten^ta^ 



Back row— Joseph Soletti, Robert Howarth, Matt Hickey, Boone Ruffing, Tommy Lee. Middle row— Gary Long, John Meni- 
chini, Patrick Gallagher, Front row— John Murphy, John Kaddouri. 



118 




<P*a6e£te*tie 



Back row— Lori Guelfi, Anne LeBlanc, Carmen Van den Hombergh, Susi Schott, Priscilla Gostkowski, Staci Mann, Lesley 
Mayre, Gretchen Otis, Maryann Pipelow, Jeanne Campisi, Tracy Daoud. Front row— Donna Montana, Colleen Clifford, Kelly 
Hazinski, Mary Noa, Lolo Pasquini, Rebecca Calvert, Cathy Livingston, Kathy Britton. 



119 



>puSf^ 





2$E 

Unity . . . power . . . brotherhood . . . 
Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . little sisters . . . 
Homecoming . . . celebrating 5 years 
. . . remember Tim, Phil, Michael, Paul, 
Berry, Tom, Greg — founding fathers 
. . . red, gold, blue . . . golden hearts 
. . . Sigma Phi Epsilon . . . brother- 
hood . . . power . . . unity. Photo- 
graphs: (counter-clockwise)— 1. 
Members— (back & middle 
rows) — Kevin White, Jim Sullivan, 
Tom Keeley, Jamie Fleming, Nick 
Lessey, Kenneth Corgan, Bruce 
Esher, Scott Anderson, Mike Sal- 
zar, Steve Odierno, John 
Kellner, Shawn Lachapelle, Ken 
Taylor, Tony Magone, John 
Dickinson, George Gano, Mi- 
B chael Reardon, Greg Wade. 
» (front row) — Little sisters — 
Jeanne, Kim, Patricia, Patty, 
Donna, Patricia, Katie, 
Kathy. 2. The Sigma Phi Epsi- 
lon traditional jeep mowing 
through Homecoming turf 
and displaying a National 
red, gold and blue. 3. Sen- 
iors Mike, George, John, 
Greg, Ken, Bruce, Nick, 
Shawn and Tony gather 
for a farewell photo. 4. 
Thanks to the little sis- 
ters—they keep those 
boys in line (and vice- 
versa). 5. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon represents 
many things to many 
people — namely 
brotherhood, unity 
and striving for ex- 
cellence. . . . thus 
Sig Phi Ep says it all! 



121 




Aon 



Unity . . . power . . . sisterhood . . . 
Alpha Omicron Pi ... a new sorority 
. . . building friendship . . . pledging 
. . . learning . . . laughing . . . living 
. . . red and white . . . reaching out 
. . . gaining acceptance . . . cre- 
ating original channels . . . service 
. . . fun . . . Alpha Omicron Pi . . . 
sisterhood . . . power . . . unity. 
Photographs: (counter-clock- 
wise) — 1. Members of the 
newly organized Alpha Omi- 
cron Pi — (back row) — Cindy 
Roughly, Karen Citarella Su- 
zanne Bertels, Denise Ken- 
worthy, Karen Foley, Rebec- 
ca Summers, Antoinette 
Rahming, Jacque Danes, 
Maria Lisa Palermo, Lori Fra- 
tarchangelo, (middle 
row) — Rosalie Kelly, Caro- 
lyn Weiner, Donna Benar- 
dello, Kristi Fink, Candace 
Leverett, Tina Nemerof, 
Jeanette deCamp, Re- 
bakah Marshall, (back 
row) — Donna Foote, 
Tracy Mcmenimon, Ju- 
lianne Mello, Colleen 
Dieterle, Lisa Zaccig- 
nini, Sandra Pendar- 
vis, Toni Restaino, 
Helene Colon. 2. 
President Donna. 3. 
Saint Leo College, 
new home for A- 
O-Pi. 4. The ex- 
ecutive staff. 5. A 
crowd scene — 
Alpha Omicron 
Pi stands out. 



123 



V£S 



et\uvv& 




nx$ 



Unity . . . power . . . brotherhood . . . 
Pi Kappa Phi . . . PUSH . . . fellowship . . . 
Pi Kappa Phi . . . National . . . we've 
only just begun . . . creating a new 
movement . . . building prominence 
. . . gaining ground . . . chartered . . . 
gaining ground . . . new little sisters 
. . . attending conferences . . . pre- 
senting new and original ideas . . . 
making our fraternity stronger . . . 
supporting ... Pi Kappa Phi ... 
brotherhood . . . power . . . unity. 
Photographs: (counter-clock- 
wise) — 1 Members of the new- 
ly-chartered Pi Kappa Phi — 
(back row) — Kevin Albury, 
Drew Dixon, Rati Alanzi, Greg 
Kent, Christopher Baetzel, Don 
Robson, John Elzeer, James 
Barlow, (middle row) — Fred 
Lesswing, Bill Huttig, John Ben- 
edettie, Joseph Nichirco, Bill 
Brown, Patrick Hannigan. 
(front row) — Tom McMena- 
min, Sean Spray, Chris Kar- 
anitsos, Kevin Good, Greg 
Gilmore. 2. Bill Brown and 
John Elzeer represent Pi 
Kap in a group photo. 3. 
The Pi Kappa Phi little sis- 
ters — Mary Ellen, Linda, 
Joanna, Maria Lisa, Re- 
becca, Leslie, Kristi. 4. 
Little sister Linda 
Scheper in action dur- 
ing the March Greek 
Week events. 5. Pi 
Kappa Phi, although 
newly formed, initi- 
ates and partici- 
pates in various Na- 
tional activities, 
including the PUSH 
program. 



125 




A$ 



Unity . . . power . . . sisterhood . . . 
Alpha Sigma . . . outstanding sorority 
. . . Greek Week Champs . . . They 
"remember who they are" . . . the 
best year . . . Greek Goddess . . . 
joining . . . struggling . . . J.D., Louie, 
Bobby, Tommy Lee . . . experienc- 
ing .. . friendship . . . let's go to the 
bar and have one to celebrate . . . 
Alpha Sigma . . . sisterhood . . . 
power . . . unity. Photographs: 
(counter clock-wise) — 1. Alpha 
Sigma members for 1984- 
1 985— (back row)— Lori Guelfi, 
Laura Donovan, Mary Noa, Tra- 
cy Doaud, Maureen Reed, 
Shelia Crotty, Joanna Apfl. 
(front row) — Regina Fitzger- 
ald, Cheryl Giraldi, Cathy Liv- 
ingston, Kimberly Eastman, 
Loriann Taylor, Patricia Mari- 
ner, Patty Krop. 2. Alpha 
Sigma celebrates after a 
particularly favorable win 
in the March Greek Week 
finals . . . that's what 
makes them a winning 
group . . . spirit. 3. Mary 
Noa has a personal 
coach to give her en- 
couragement during 
the tug-of-war trials. 4. 
Alpha Sig insists it's 
number one . . . and 
with a group like this, 
who would argue? 5. 
A crisp fall day finds 
the members of Al- 
pha Sigma cheer- 
ing for their favor- 
ite frat football 



team or celebrat- 
ing ... anything! 
Here lie memen- 
tos of a suc- 
cessful year. 



127 



*• 




SA 



Unity . . . power . . . brotherhood . . . 
Sigma Lambda . . . brings the rope 
and football where it should be . . . 
athletics . . . softball . . . tradition 
breaking barriers . . . thanks Joe for a 
great year . . . strength . . . fellow- 
ship . . . dominating . . . Greek 
Week . . . Sigma Lambda . . . broth- 
erhood . . . power . . . unity. Photo- 
graphs: (counter-clockwise)—! 
Members of Sigma Lambda— 
(back row)— Toni Restaino, Ed 
Putz, Michael Brown, Glenn Hill, 
Mark McAvoy, Michael 
McNulty, Robert Gibree, Thom- 
as Freer, (middle row)— Chris- 
tine Porath, Frank Cristell, Eric 
Jayne, Tom Guthier, Joseph 
Soletti, Charles Langworth, 
Anthony Varoilo, Moira Kelly, 
(front row)— Lisa Gaudette, 
Paul, James Lean, John 
Menichini, Robert Santos, 
Michael Stanfield, Todd 
Gerard, Stephan Jan- 
nuzzo, Sandy Schoren, 
John Paternoster. 2 Sig- 
ma Lambda gives their 
all during the tug-of-war 
trials. 3. Some members 
take time out for a 
break from Greek 
Week activities. 4. 
Heat and dust sur- 
round the exhausted 
contestants of 
Lambda's tug-of- 
war team as the 
tension intensifies 
... 5. The Sigma 



Lambda Fraternity 
"Death Mo- 
bile" — repre- 
senting the pow- 
er and endur- 
ance behind 
the name . . . 



129 



1&A> 




»v 



\ 
v 









T0E 

Unity . . . power . . . sisterhood . . . Psi 
Theta Epsilon ... big sister, little sister 
. . . gaining recognition . . . growing in 
friendship . . . daisies . . . purple (roy- 
alty) . . . hitting the beach . . . we're 
getting there and getting ahead! 
. . . laughing . . . living . . . becoming 
active . . . attending class, not at- 
tending class . . . moving on . . . Psi 
Theta Epsilon . . . sisterhood . . . 
power . . . unity. Photographs: 
(counter-clockwise) — 1. Sisters 
of the Psi Theta Epsilon Sorority 
include — Sara Smith, Heather 
Whitney, Linda Scheper, Kim- 
berly McLain, Beth Maitland, 
Trish Mulkerin, Donna Montana, 
Trisha Broderick, Jean Quintel, 
Jennifer Sudol, Mary Quintal, 
Rebecca Calvert, Michele 
Rotondo. 2. A Psi Theta Epsi- 
lon Sister jumps to victory 
during the annual Greek 
H Week festivities. 3. Mem- 
bers of Psi Theta Epsilon 
flash the green and gold 
of Saint Leo and the gold 
and Purple of their own 
territory during Home- 
coming. 4. Trish Mulkerin 
soaks up some rays as 
she reclines between 
Greek Week events. 
What's that whistle 
for, Trish? 5. A daisy, 
cap and jersey rest 
beneath a Psi Theta 
.'"| paddle — symbols 
;, of establishment 
and a growing uni- 
ty of spirit. 




131 




132 





Unity . . . power . . . brotherhood . . . 
Alpha Sigma Chi . . . perfect unit of 
brotherhood . . . interdevelopment 
. . . interior and exterior justice . . . 
community service . . . maroon and 
gold . . . bricks ... 21st anniversary 
. . . "the Brown Tide" . . . Fidelitas 
Justitia Fortitudo . . . faith, justice 
and strength . . . tradition of broth- 
erhood . . . growing as a team 
and as individuals . . . the chi flies 
high . . . enjoying life . . . making 
life enjoyable for others ... Al- 
pha Sigma Chi . . . brotherhood 
. . . power . . . unity. Photo- 
graphs: (counter-clockwise) — 
1, Members of Alpha Sigma 
Chi look on as Greek Week 
festivities continue. Their own 
involvment was far from just 
crowd participation — AEX 
excelled in many activities. 
2. Andy "breaks away" in a 
« gallant effort during Greek 
Week track and field 
events. 3. Sweating and 
slightly fatigued by the 
Florida sun, Alpha Sigma 
Chi rolls into the final 
stretch of the Greek 
Week chariot races. 4. 
A smooth pass-off be- 
tween AEX brothers as 
Greek Week relay 
races continue . . . 
teamwork is the 
name of the game! 
5. A pledge brick 
.a and fraternity jer- 
sey reflected in the 
mid-day sun. In 
other words . . . 
Alpha Sigma Chi 
always shines . . . 



133 




.' .* 






\"1 





Unity . . . power . . . sisterhood . . . 
Delta Phi Delta . . . sharing and always 
caring . . . red and blue . . . active . . . 
Greek Week . . . Elval Unsokel Elval . . . 
initiated 1964 . . . growing up and 
out . . . expanding horizons . . . gain- 
ing notoriety . . . sisterhood means 
forever . . . friendships . . . defeats 
. . . victories . . . Delta Phi Delta . . . 
sisterhood . . . power . . . unity. 
Photographs: (counter-clock- 
wise) — 1 Delta Phi Delta mem- 
bers include — (back row) — Ka- 
tie Beyer, Leslie Yalden, Karen 
Manzi, Leah Saker, Alicia Hasiak, 
Chris Freisen, Carmen Van den 
Homberg, Danielle Gerardi, 
Bonnie Matthews, (middle 
row) — Suzanne Dickey, Col- 
leen Clany, Lisa Rudolph, Lori 
Maselli, Kerry McNulty, Mary 
Schaad. (front row)— Kim 
Homan, Karen Petitt, Maria 
Viola, Sally Desilva. 2. Delta 
Phi Delta members strug- 
r ^ gle off the field after a tir- 
ing track event. 3. Two 
Delta pledges pause for 
a quick photo. They 
demonstrate an impor- 
tant principle to Delta 
members — friendship. 
4. Alicia comprises the 
cheering section for 
her Delta sisters as 
they compete in a 
Greek Week tug-of- 
war. 5. "Do it up 
Delta — 5 in a row" 
boasts a winning 
Greek Week re- 
cord unsurpassed 



135 




SB 



Unity . . . power . . . brotherhood . . . 
Sigma Beta . . . founded in 1964 . . . 
the Trat with Class" . . . derbies and 
walking sticks . . . enthusiastic . . . 
Greek Week . . . We're proud . . . fel- 
lowship . . . getting tougher . . . 
growing stronger . . . gold and blue 
. . . Budwiser . . . breaking away . . . 
rising above . . . dedication . . . Sig- 
ma Beta . . . brotherhood . . . 
power . . . unity. Photographs: 
(counter-clockwise) — 1. Mem- 
bers of this year's Sigma Beta 
Frat include — (back row) — 
Luke Putz, Louis Trottier, John 
Biever, Mark Lundy, Davie 
Purpi, Ron Allison, (middle 
row) — Dave Mercadante, 
Rob Howarth, William Friel, Jay 
Nash, Hugh O'Donell. (front 
row) — Joe Dasti, Joe Con- 
nellan, Sean O'Conner, Ray 
McGrath, Jamie Powers. 2. 
Greek Week tennis match- 
es featuring Sigma Beta 
and a strong forward 
pitch. 3. Sigma Beta 
members mingle with the 
crowd during Greek 
Week festivities. 4. The 
traditional Sigma Beta 
pose — on, by or 
around a Budwiser 
truck. The question 
is — how do they get 
up there anyway? 
And how do they 
get up with bottles? 
Pretty tricky stuff, 
boys! 5. The ex- 
pression on this 
Sigma Beta Broth- 
er says it all — 
v We're tough 
and we know 
it." 



137 



0^¥^ 





$T£i 



Unity . . . power . . . sisterhood ... Phi 
Tau Omega . . . Greek Goddess . . . 
"Thou my friend 'til the end" . . . 
Homecoming . . . Greek Week . . . 
Branching out . . . Gaining ground . . . 
spreading roots . . . West Palm 
Beach . . . Victory, Victory ... a 
step above . . . farewell Seniors . . . 
fun ... sun .. . Phi Tau Omega . . . 
sisterhood . . . power . . . unity. 
Photographs: (counter-clock- 
wise)— Members of Phi Tau 
Omega for 1985— (back 
row) — Anne LeBlanc, Staci 
Mann, Kelly Hazinskl Ann-Marie 
Gace, Susan Knast, Marilyn 
Meehan, Priscilla Gostkowski. 
(middle row) — Susi Schott, 
Mike Reardon (sweetheart), 
Gretchen Otis, Lolo Pasquini, 
(front row) — Joellie Swan- 
jA son, Mary Ann Pieplow, Bet- 
* sy Taylor, Mrs. Lachance, 
Ana Crespo, Jeannie 
Campisi. 2. Phi Tau Omega 
makes the shot-put look 
effortless thanks to the 
graceful action of Stacie 
Mann. 3. Priscilla and 
Anne become a lion 
and friend for the 
Homecoming parade. 
4. Phi Tau sisters prac- 
tice their steps while 
preparing for a Greek 
Week three-legged 
race. 5. Here lies ev- 
erything you need 
to be a genuine Phi 
Tau Omega sister 
. . . plus a little luck 
and a generous 
heart . . . and a 



special willing- 
ness to help 
yourself and 
others . . . 



: 



139 



Sty** 



^app* 





KAS 

Unity . . . power . . . brotherhood . . . 
Kappa Alpha Sigma . . . The South . . . 
obligation . . . tradition . . . Caritas et 
Varitas . . . high character and truth 
. . . style . . . Confederates . . . the 
Frat with Heart . . . brothers . . . 
Greek Week ... we make the dif- 
ference . . . high ideals . . . individ- 
uals ... as one . . . Kappa Alpha 
Sigma . . . brotherhood . . . power 
. . unity. Photographs: (counter- 
clockwise)— 1. K-Alpha Sig 
members for this year were — 
(back row) — Tracy Daoud, Ed- 
ward Shortt, Patrick O'Loughlin, 
David Hobson, Robert Samar- 
tin, Patrick Carse, Loriann Tay- 
lor, Robert (Jersey Joe) Dew- 
ey, (middle row) — Kevin, 
Patrick Gallagher, Charles 
Haure, Stephan Jannuzzo, 
Brian McCue. (front row)— 
Thomas Catizone, Brian 
Diaz, Danny Regan. 2. 
Dave Hobson of KAE and 
John Biever of Sigma Beta 
pose for a family portrait. 
3. The shot put is under 
control via Kappa Alpha 
Sigma. 4. Getting down 
to business— Kappa Al- 
pha Sigma puts brawn 
and brains together in 
an attempt to outwit 
or out-pull their op- 
ponent. 5. What 
more can be said? 
KAE has everything 
it takes to be a suc- 
cessful frat . . . the 



power, unity and 

brotherhood that 

makes allies and 

breaks enemies. 

So . . . rebels — 

unite! 



141 



f^app* 



^kefa 




.agfc^ 






K0 



Unity . . . power . . . brotherhood . . . 
Kappa Theta . . . service . . . Blood 
drive ... a little help from our friends 
. . . family away from home . . . little 
sisters . . . reaching out . . . Greek 
Week . . . Congrats George (Home- 
coming King) . . . motivation ... a 
photograph is worth a thousand 
words (or a thousand bucks— right 
John?) . . . gaining strength ... A 
world apart . . . Kappa Theta . . . 
brotherhood . . . power . . . unity. 
Photographs: (counter-clock- 
wise)—! Kappa Theta mem- 
bers— (back row)— John Kad- 
douri, Tommy Lee, Mike 
Reardon, Robert Mulrey, Matt 
Hickey, Mark Duford, Boone 
Ruffing, (front row)— John 
Finnerty, Schyler Simone, Kel- 
ly Hazinski, Jill Bordonara, 
Anne Marie Gail, Garry 
Long, Harry Vail, Jonathon 
Walker, Lisa Spalding, Rob 
Mulrey, Patrick Wells. 2. 
Kappa Theta contends in 
the Greek Week canoe 
races. 3. Kappa Theta 
brother John Kaddouri 
sets up for a photo — 
thanks for all the year- 
book help, John, and 
% congrats on your 
* election to Student 
Government Presi- 
dent! 4. KO treks the 
last mile with their 
chariot. 5. That tre- 
mendous KO pow- 
er is the determin- 
ing factor in many 
a match . . . 



W* 1 »V**j"' 



143 





GQZZK 5oi?JI/Ul 



Greek Week 1985 began in the tradition- 
al way — with a fun-filled formal dance 
where Sorority and Fraternity members 
gathered to kick-off seven consecutive 
days of excitment. Lob Pasquini and Matt 
Hickey were crowned Greek Goddess and 
God, an outstanding honor (as evidenced 
by the tears in Lob's eyes and smile on 
Matt's face). 

Photographs: 1. (below) — Some smiles and 
satin from sorority members. 2. (oppo- 
site) — Matt and Lob. 3. (opposite, large 
photo) Lob clings to Matt and cries after 
realizing she has been named the new 
Greek Goddess. 4. (opposite, top right) — 
The first activity of the week. 5. (opposite, 
bottom right) — Some quiet time amid the 
music. 







144 




The annual Greek formal featured the crowning of 
Matt Hickey (Kappa Theta) and Lolo Pasquini (Phi Tau 
Omega). 



145 



'4 



^iAfTTcrP^TTOjlf . . . 

It builds slowly . . . ever so slowly. Prepara- 
tion and planning are the key to all success- 
ful endeavors — watching, waiting and 
struggling are the price we must pay for 
victory. The anticipation associated with 
Greek Week did not end when the first 
event began, but continued relentlessly 
throughout every activity. Sorority and Fra- 
ternity groups stood on the sidelines, cheer- 
ing their commrades and stamping in frus- 
tration when that last pull or throw was not 
quite enough. Swimming, canoeing, run- 
ning, jumping, tugging and swinging their 
way to the grand finals, all members exper- 
ienced the high and low points of competi- 
tion, the winnings and defeats . . . the an- 
ticipation of . . . 





m 



146 








Photographs: 1. (opposite, far left)— Phi 
Tau Omega gains ground during the tug- 
of-war competition. 2. (opposite, mid- 
dle) — Preparations are under way in both 
the Phi Tau Omega and Alpha Sigma 
camps. Troops bring in supplies and sun- 
ning gear for a hard day in the field. 3. 
(top, large photo)— Delta Phi Delta 
watch and anticipate victory as their so- 
rority sisters battle. 4. (opposite)— AEX 
and KO brothers sit on the sidelines and 
wait for developments. 5. (above) — Sig- 
ma Lambda brother grimaces as he holds 
the line. 



147 



.^*jgam 



. tylCTOQlt 



It materializes when you least expect it. 
That thai moment, when a pull or push was 
just enough to break the other side. The 
waiting finally ceases and tension melts into 
exhilaration . . . victory! Suddenly all the 
swimming, canoeing, running, jumping, tug- 
ging and swinging become unimportant as 
the atmosphere escalates. All the partici- 
pants of Greek Week were winners in one 
way or another — their endurance, good 
faith and warm support of each other guar- 
anteed that! The festival was a victory in 
many ways — a time for friends to spend a 
few days growing closer and working hard- 
er .. . too bad there aren't more Greek 
Weeks — but then again, the thrill of victory 
is much more valuable when it's rarely felt. 





m s 



148 







*-p j£*t^ 



CHAMPS ■ 





Photographs: 1, (opposite, far left)— A 
frenzy of victory for fraternity brothers- 
Greek Week style! 2. (opposite, mid- 
dle)— A group of spectators gather in un- 
usual viewing positions to watch the 
games. 3. (top, large photo)— The pa- 
tience of Delta Phi Delta is rewarded. 4. 
(opposite)— Canoe racing. 5. (above)— 
"Greek Week Champs— Five in a Row" is 
the battle cry of the girls in Delta Phi Delta. 



-^ 



149 



Greek Goddess Lolo Pasquini can't quite seem to 
get the hang of that mortal game— egg toss. At 
any rate, she doesn't appear too concerned any- 
way! Back to Mount Olympus! 




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Speed and precision 
are only half the chal- 
lenge. The real test of a 
cross country runner's 
strength can be ex- 
pressed with one term — 
endurance. This year's 
team coupled this endur- 
ance with an impulse for 
excellence that only in- 
creased as the season 
continued. 

Team members were: 
(women's) Sue Carr, Julie 
Dillion, Rosalie Kelly, Mary 
Letcher, Patty Mariner, 
Suzy Sanderson, Phyllis 
Shalor; (men's) Brian Bra- 
disle, Matt Coyne, An- 
drew Phillips, Aubrey 
Rudd, Ken Taylor. 



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CROSS COUNTRY 




worthy of the challenge. Patience and perseverance earned the 
;feam second place in the Sunshine State Conference Tourna- 
ment—an accomplishment that helps to continue the team's 
reputation for tough playing. Members were (in ranked order): 
Kelly Haley, Sue Rogers, Kay Crisler, Nancy MacLellan, Kerry 
McNulty, Kara O'Brien, and Pat Murphy. 

Photos: 1 It looks easy when Sue Rogers hits the ball. 2. Kay 
Crisler shows her "true grit." 3. This smile proves that "love" for 
tennis is not a losing proposition. 4. Is this "disco fever" with a 
tennis racket? 5. Kelly Haley is ready for anything. 






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Power. Precision. Athletic impulse disci- 
plined by long hours of practice. The 
men's tennis team members proved their 
abilities on the courts time after time. 
Coached by Tom Crosby, the team con- 
sisted of (in ranking order): Mark Robinson, 
Rob Schultz, Greg Kennedy, Jeff Daly, 
Chris Cannon, Walter Mathews, and Jeff 
Johnston. 

Photos: 1. Although it may look other- 
wise, tennis is a team sport. 2. Rob Schultz 
sweet talks the ball. 3. Jeff Daly waves to 
his fans as he smashes the ball. 4. The ag- 
ony of a lost set. 5. Mark Robinson's exper- 
ience pays off in tight spots. 6. Walter 
Mathews concentrates before the serve. 



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SOCCE^9^W^1^M\W&^l§i^U6gefW^e , Jamie WSran. laTf'Guy, 
Powers, Ken Betz (co-captain), Al Redway; Middle: Rusty Murdaugh, J6e Hill (co-captain), Paul Bogensberger, 
Mariano Reis, Pat Hannigan, Kevin Wilson, Dwayne Thwaites> Reed Camron, Steve Lauriston, Ed Raleigh; Back: 
Head Coach Hal Henderson, Brett Elmblad, Ed Gonzalez, Mike Kane, Don Schambach, Roberto Muvki, Scott 
Bialy, Steve Martel, Greg Wiita, Peter Quinlan, Guy Pierre. 



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Blocks and bruises, tackles 
and twisted ankles. The 1985 
soccer team, under the 
coaching of Hal Henderson, 
became a tough unit 
through rapid but careful 
training for the season. Rely- 
ing on. experienced players 
to lead newer players to 
more confidence, the team 
pushed ahead through a 
jam-packed September- 
October schedule. Despite 
a disappointing season, 
these Monarchs look for- 
ward to new victories in the 
future — and will never give 
up that impulsive desire to 
be "the best." 



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WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 



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Ipse people will say. 
P#85 Lady Monarchs 
^seemed to understand this 
Hruism and exhibited their 
maturity on the court. 
Coach John Swart led his 
players through a season of 
hard work, patience, and 
perseverence that served 
to better each individual — 
and the performance of the 
team as a whole. 

Team members were: 
Denise Brooks, Ronda Car- 
man, Theresa Dozier, Chris 
Freisen, Ursula Kirnes, Mary 
Letcher, Karen Manzi, Con- 
nie McKotch, Kim McLain, 
Sandra Pendarvis, Jeannie 
Quintal, Mary Quintal, Cath- 
leen Warwick. 



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Photos: 1. The team concen- 
trates on Coach Swart's 
instructions during a needed 
time-out. 2. Chris Freisen's fast 
break for the hoop pays off. 3. 
Teamwork is a necessity! 4. 
Swish! 5. Ursula Kirnes vs. four 
opponents — they can do 
nothing but watch her fly.. 6. 
Denise Books slides by an op- 
ponent. 7. Team spirit is obvious 
as members form a supportive 
huddle. 



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SAINT LEO 



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MEN'S BASKETBALL: Helene Colon (head man- 
ager), Jim Wilson, Todd Whillhite, Zan Hairston, Bri- 
an Moore, Tim Lovett, Dave Kelley, Tony DeCelis, 
Scott Thatcher, Dave Alley, Rod Murray, Duane 
Fort, Lorenzo Thurmin, Steve Ceseretti, Lori Lawlor 
(manager), Hal Henderson (trainer), Brother Bill 
Orosz (chaplain), Gary Richert (head coach), 
Tom Phillips (assistant coach). 




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Photos: 1 Jim Wilson hits the ozone 
layer. 2. Monarch on the move! 3. 
Lorenzo Thurman makes it look easy. 
4. Fancy footwork or the Tampa Bal- 
let? 5. Coach Richert seems happy. 
6. David Kelley sneaks one by. 7. A 
sure sign of a Monarch victory. 8. El- 
len Fitzgerald— ready to sing the na- 
tional anthem. 9. Dr. Southard and 
^James Dotherow watch from the 
Stands. 






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BASEBALL TEAM: (front row) Rob Turner, Darrin 
Gaeta, Bobby Link, Don Frazier, J.D. Paternoster, 
Phil Ross, Chris Catanoso, Patty Wagner; (second 
row) Nikki DeMercado, Cliff Champion, Don LoR- 
usso, Cisco Johnson, Bob Farina, Stan Alston, Greg 
Sims, Rick Rex, Ken Norman; (Back row) Sue Cos- 
lett, Bobby Connerney, Joe Spagnuolo, Mike Hen- 
riquez, Coach Mike Marshall, Bryan Lucchesi, John 
Corsi, Brent Honeywell, Bobby White. 



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Photos: 1. Brother Bill Orosz and 
Paul Bermel keep their eyes on 
the game. 2. A coach-pitcher 
conference. 3. Stan Alston rubs 
his sun-weary eyes.: 4. J. D. Pa- 
ternoster hurls a fast one. 5. Phil 
Ross looks hungry for a piece of 
the ball. 6. The Monarch out- 
field gobbles up a pop fly. 1 ... 
The tools of the trade. 



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Photos: 1 The Florida sun can 
be both a hindrance and a 
help; it depends on who's up to 
bat. 2. Rob Turner concen- 
trates on the batter. 3. Team- 
work is the key— even off the 
field. 4. Coach Marshall and the 
team watch the game from 
the dug-out. 5. Stan Alston is 
ready at the bat. 6. "Dr. Base- 
ball" prescribes the cure for a 
batting slump. 7. Sometimes, 
when the outlook is grim, it 
takes a little introspection to 
hang tight. 8. Monarch power 
on the mound. 






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This is one last look at 
the many sides of colle- 
giate sports. From the 
pain of injuries to the fa- 
tigue of practice after 
practice, the demands of 
excellence are high. But 
Monarch players accept 
the challenges and strive 
to meet personal and 
team goals. for victory. 



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ANOTHER LOOK 







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On the golf course. In 
the pool. Upside down 
and inside out. Florida's 
balmy days and casual 
lifestyle give Saint Leo stu- 
dents the opportunity to 
set impusle in action. 
Bumper stickers glued on 
parked cars suggest al- 
ternatives to (yawn!) 
studying: "I'd rather be 
sailing, golfing, dancing, 
or playing tennis." Saint 
Leo can be fun— almost 
like a country club with tu- 
tors. (Sshhh! Don't tell 
Mom.) 



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BASEBALL 



FL Atlantic 


6-10 








F.I.T. 


1-11 








F.I.T. 


8-4 








Bethune Cookman 


11-10 








Jacksonville 


6-22 








Jacksonville 


11-22 








Florida A&M 


10-9 








Florida A&M 


17-9 








Florida State 


2-16 








Eastern Michigan 


9-9 








Western Michigan 


17-5 








Jacksonville 


18-5 








Jacksonville 


6-6 


WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 


MEN'S BASK 


F.I.T. 


6-12 








F.I.T. 


4-5 








Tennessee Temple 


7-0 


Marietta College 


65-54 


Franklin Pierce 


Univ. of Detroit 


10-1 


Clearwtr Christian Coll. 


68-38 


Palm Beach Atlantic 


Richmond 


18-6 


Georgia State 


67-101 


Georgia State U. 


West Chester 


22-8 


Flagler College 


97-56 


lona College 


Ithaca 


8-6 


Univ. of Florida 


47-109 


Georgetown Univ. 


Xavier 


13-6 


Florida Atlantic U. 


63-52 


Barry Univ. 


American Int'l 


16-9 


Purdue U. 


62-67 


Morehouse College 


Wayne State 


5-1 


Rockford College 


68-48 


Franklin College 


Florida A&M 


9-6 


Univ. of Missouri 


62-65 


Transylvania U. 


Florida A&M 


28-8 


Pace Univ. 


45-77 


Birmingham Southern 


Fordham 


9-5 


Florida Atlantic 


43-58 


MSOE 


Milligan 


RO 


California Univ. 


45-62 


Greensboro Coll. 


Univ. of Toledo 


13-3 


Eckerd 


66-51 


Guilford College 


Rollins 


3-12 


Univ. of the South 


77-40 


Birmingham Southern 


Rollins 


16-10 


Flagler College 


82-43 


Alabama Christian 


St. Thomas 


6-9 


Rollins 


65-56 


Eckerd College 


St. Thomas 


2-9 


Tampa 


66-72 


F.I.T. 


DePaul 


8-4 


Clearwtr Christian Coll. 


88-42 


St, Thomas 


Eckerd 


22-23 


Florida Southern 


50-71 


Florida Southern 


Eckerd 


7-8 


Florida Southern 


46-61 


Univ. of Tampa 


South Florida 


1-9 


Rollins 


57-76 


Rollins 


Calvin 


6-9 


Eckerd 


65-55 


F.I.T. 


Tampa 


10-18 


Edward Waters Coll. 


75-58 


Florida Southern 


Tampa 


6-8 


Tampa 


77-84 


St. Thomas 


Rollins 


8-10 


Florida Southern 


43-87 


Eckerd College 


Rollins 


1-16 






Univ. of Tampa 


FL Southern 


0-4 






Rollins 


FL Southern 


11-21 








Eckerd 


1-4 








Tampa 


2-12 








Tampa 


10-14 








St. Thomas 


5-12 








St. Thomas 


14-12 








FL Southern 


1-12 








FL Southern 


10-6 








Eckerd 


5-13 









176 



SOCCER 















Warner Southern 


4-2 








MEN'S TENNIS 




Stetson 

Palm Beach Atlantic 


0-1 
3-1 














Coll. of Boca Raton 


0-14 


WOMEN'S TENNIS 




Rollins 

Florida Southern 




0-9 
5-4 


St. Thomas 
Flagler 


2-3 
1-7 








Tampa 




8-1 


Tampa 


0-4 


Florida Atlantic 




1-8 


Jacksonville 




2-7 


Stetson 


1-0 


Tampa 




9-0 


Florida A&M 




9-0 


F.I.T. 


1-1 


Florida A&M 




5-4 


West Florida 




2-7 


Palm Beach Atlantic 


1-0 


West Florida 




3-6 


Tampa 




7-2 


Florida Atlantic 


0-2 


Tampa 




8-1 


F.I.T. 




2-7 


Eckerd 


0-4 


Florida Southern 




0-9 


Eckerd 




7-2 


Rollins 


1-13 


Jacksonville 




0-9 


Stetson 




8-1 


F.I.T. 


9-2 


Stetson 




3-6 


Florida Southern 




5-4 


Florida Southern 


0-2 


Boca Raton 




4-5 


Eckerd 




7-2 


Barry 


1-2 


Florida Atlantic 




2-7 


Ball State 




1-8 






3arry Univ. 




9-0 


Eastern Michigan 




2-7 


SOFTBALL 




St. Thomas 




9-0 


Lyndon State 




9-0 




Eckerd College 




9-0 


South Dakota 




6-3 






Eastern Michigan 




1-8 


Wabash College 




9-0 


Eckerd 


0-12 


Florida Southern 




0-9 


St. Thomas 




9-0 


Eckerd 


4-12 


South Dakota 




7-2 


Northern Kentucky 




9-0 


Purdue— Extension 


4-15 


Boston Univ. 




0-9 


Southern Mississippi 




3-6 


Purdue — Extension 


8-11 


St. Thomas 




0-9 


St, Ambrose 




3-6 


Eckerd 


1-11 


Lehigh 




0-9 


Delta State 




4-5 


Eckerd 


13-8 


Jacksonville St. U. 




4-5 


St. Thomas 




9-0 


Florida Southern 


2-16 


College of Wooster 




9-0 


Florida Atlantic 




3-6 


Florida Southern 


1-15 


Fordham 




3-6 


Barry 




8-1 


Maryville 


0-14 


Jacksonville St. U. 




0-9 


Rockford 




9-0 


Maryville 


4-15 


North Florida 




1-8 


College of Wooster 




8-1 


lll.-Bendictine 


2-18 


U.S. Air Force 




5-4 


F.I.T. 




5-4 


lll.-Bendictine 


1-11 


SSC Tournament 


2nd p 


lace 


SSC Tournament 


4th place 


Flordia Southern 


0-12 


St. Olaf 




9-0 


Delaware 




5-4 


Florida Southern 


0-36 


Stetson 




4-5 


Jacksonville 




3-6 


F.I.T. 


2-3 








North Florida 




1-8 


F.I.T. 


4-21 








Rollins 




0-9 


F.I.T. 

Spring Arbor 

Spring Arbor 

Rollins 

Rollins 


RO 

0-14 

3-11 

1-14 

13-16 



177 



*76<e> StUttt ^.ca &o££eye "pivot /4wicmU 



Photography is the main constituent 
of any yearbook, a collection of im- 
ages which record the events, lives, 
and expressions of people and their 
world at a glance. Certain individuals 
can be "frozen" in time by the camera 
lens and reflect qualities we term "pho- 
togenic." The yearbook staff has at- 
tempted to capture these attributes 



by initiating the first annual "Miss Gold- 
en Legend" contest at Saint Leo Col- 
lege. Several young women were cho- 
sen for this honor by members of the 
administration and the yearbook edi- 
torial staff. The criteria for selection was 
based solely on each individual's natu- 
ral photogenic qualities. 



Julie Dillon 



Cathi Rem 




Christine Porath 



Cathi, Justine and Maria 



Posing in formal wear. 



178 




Justine Kerssenmakers 



Patricia Broderick 



Tracy McMenmion 




Lori Oliva 



Jeannie Campisi 



Maria Viola 



179 




^inat TQcutaen-cifi, 



Photo by Seppie Allan 



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182 



Photo by Doug Latino 




Photo by Doug Latino 



183 



THE WORLD ... THE WORLD ... THE WORLD Th 
















WHO WHAT WHERE WHY WHEN WHO WHAT W 



184 



E WORLD ... THE WORLD ... THE WORLD . . . 




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The little universe of SLC is surrounded by an even larger 
sphere of change and impulse. People, events, and con- 
cerns around the world break through the barriers of indi- 
vidual communities and become part of a collective con- 
sciousness. 

In the Unitea States of America, eyes were focused on 
the Statue of Liberty as she celebrated her 98th birthday in 
1984. Worn from constant pummeling by wind, salt air. and 
acid rain, the statue was baaiy in need of repair. Pride 
became the impetus of action as Americans stood behind 
a two year restoration plan to repair the statue's iron rib- 
bing, golb-plated torch, ana general appearance. 

In sports, the Super Bowl captured America's attention 
as the Miami Dolphins battled the San Francisco 49'ers on 
the football field. (Many Floridians were saddened by San 
Francisco's victory.) 

The 1984 Winter Olympics, held in Yugoslavia, gave 
Americans a chance to show their power and determina- 
tion. The U.S. team won four gold and four silver meaals. 
Steve Mahr took the gold in the Giant Slalom skiing event. 



HERE WHY WHEN WHO WHAT WHERE WHY WHE 



185 



THE WORLD ... THE WORLD ... THE WORLD 




WHO WHAT WHERE WHY WHEN WHO WHAT 



186 



THE WORLD ... THE WORLD ... THE WORLD 




WHERE WHY WHEN WHO WHAT WHERE WHY 



187 



FHE WORLD ... THE WORLD ... THE WORLD TH 





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WHO WHAT WHERE WHY WHEN WHO WHAT W 



188 



E WORLD ... THE WORLD ... THE WORLD . . 





Music videos were 
gaining popularity in 
entertainment circles, 
and concerts like 
those of Michael Jack- 
son's "Victory Tour" 
were the talk of par- 
ents and students 
alike. 

After years of civil 
war, "free and open" 
elections were held in 
El Salvador in 1984. 

Also in 1984, the U.S. 
Marines left Beirut. 
More than 260 Marines 
had been killed since 
their arrival in 1982 and 
war in Lebanon contin- 
ued with no end in 
sight. 

The editors of the 
Golden Legend were 
kidnapped in 1985 by 

"the Terminator." The kidnapper's demands were met and the editors 
were released unharmed. 



Thank 
you, 




i H i » ilUimiiuaEMw 

Ms. 'Allan 
your « to , ! Have f) ( »(,ii 

kidnapped, do flo' C ftl 1 

t* po I ice . ' 

Beiu Siflimoiis • i< m 

M »ll t them returned OlilV 
/?j"inQ t Haw * a „ unmarked | 
box to the year Book OffjcB 



HERE WHY WHEN WHO WHAT WHERE WHY WHE 



189 




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192 










p 









193 




Campisi 
iology 
Lakeland, Florida 



Bradenton, Florida 



Robert Ch 
Managei 
Ramsey, New Jersey 



194 




........ . . . . . , .""..",' ..- " 



Patricia Broderick 


Opal Buchanan 


Rebbecca Calvert 


Psychology 


Management 


Dance 


Tampa, Florida 


Manchester, Jamaica 


Miami, Florida 








195 




F ' -*i •* 




Guy Cosgrove 
Marketing 

East Moriches, New York 



t 





Lawrence Charles 

Management 

Reidsville, North Carolina 




Ana Crespo 

Management/Marketing 

St. Petersburg, Florida 




Robert Devery 

Management 

Mount Arlinton, New Jersey 



illiam Chr 
Physical Education 
Alva, Florida 




Tampa, Florida 









Margaret Dunn 

sical Education/Sp' 

Management 

, .«or, C j ) Vermont 






Nassau, Bahamas 



Melissa Elrick 

..estaurant Managemen. 

Fort Lauderdale. Florida 




:.: 




Christirla Forbes 

Theatre/Dance 

Nassau, Bahamas 



Accounting 
Nassau, Bahamas 



William Friel 

Management 

Lakeland, Florida 



198 






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I GAVE MY PINT-DII 
ST. ANTHONY'S Q 



Physical EducgT 
ambridge Springs. Pennsyivanic 



199 




Suzanne Harrington 
Marketing 
Pompano Beach, Flori 



Rene Hazlnski 
. sical Education/Sports 
Management 
Verde. F 



iUl 










202 




203 




Longo 
ology 

, Florida 



Wa 




Alachua, Flor 



Timothy Lovett 

Sociology 
Plant City, Florida 





IS 




Fredric 
Biolo 
New Port Richey, Florida 




206 




207 





Ifchaei Mttch 
Management 
'ooddale, Illinois 



'ert Mulrey 

>ciology 

, Massachusetts 



m,m\ : 






k O Loughlin 
lagement 
jerdale, Flori 



David Mercadante 

Management 

Glen v<e, New York 




Ci ^ 




ert Murnc 
riminology 
lore. New York 




in Palermo 
ous Educate' 
ipa, Florida 









Cheryl Powlus 


Linda Provencher 


Lucas Putz 


Elementary Education 


Theatre/Dance 


Management 


Lake Panasoffkee, Florida 


Orlando, Florida 


Miami, Florida 





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Laura Richards 

Music Theatre/English 

Fairfax, Virginia 



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.argaret 
Crimino 
"allwin, IV 




Joseph , 
Jcal Educa,, 
Management 







Chctrmaine Smith 

Management /Marketing 

St. Ann, Jamaica 



Jacgueline Smith 

Elementary Education 

Dade City, Florida 




Rebecca Sun 

Accounting 
Akron, Pennsylvania 




Thomas Wajdowicz 

Finance 
Wellington, Florida 



Finance 
Miami, Florida 



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216 





George Levins leads the Baccalaureate Mass procession. 



Tami Hahn and Patty Mariner bring forth the gifts. 





1 



Lawrence Charles and Wendy Ledoux pause 
between readings. 



Goodbyes by Father Kelly. 




Blessing of the offerings. 

April 27, 1985. A day which will live in 
infamy for hundreds of Seniors who 
walked the short path of a long road to 
recieve their diplomas on Saturday. 
"I'm too young to graduate!" was 
mixed with "Where's the door?" as stu- 
dents expressed their regret and an- 
ticipation of the event. 395 members 
of the 1985 class listened to the words 
of Florida's Governor Bob Graham and 
spent a final weekend as "College Stu- 
dents" with friends. 



Joseph Connellan recieves Communion. 



Jeannie Campisi recieves Communion. 



217 




Procession of graduates. 



Kathleen Beyer, Kerry McNulty and Lisa Rudolf. 




Associate of Arts Graduates walk to ceremonies. 



Robert Howarth, Bobby Link and John Biever. 




Loriann Taylor and Mary Noa on their way to the cere- 
monies. 



Seniors come together for a group picture. 



218 




Mr. Fiengo and Gregory Wade. 



Sophie Kerssemakers on her way to the ceremony. 



219 




Sue Knast and Anne LeBlanc. 



Dr. Southard and Governor Bob Graham. Governor Graham recieves an Honorary degree. 




The Governor speaks to the Graduates. 



Preparing to bestow the diplomas. 




Dazzled by the excitment. 



Graduates wait tor degrees to be awarded. 



220 




An overview. 



Dr. Southard and Greg Wade. 




George Levins receiving an award. 



Patricia Mariner and Dr. Southard. 



Matt Hickey receives his diploma. 




how many miles i have walked 

along the environment of my mind 

through the devious boulevards 

of my cranium 

while i searched for wisdom 

in futility and despair 

stumbling through the potholes 

scrambling for ultimates 

in my books and my teachers and my God 

now and then touching 

in this elusive moment of time here 

my own mystery 



Congratulations Eddie! 



contours of creation by bernard of saint leo . . . April '85 



221 




Robert Santo is called forward. 



George Levins. 



ROTC members take their oaths. 




ROTC graduation party. 



Brass on Lance's jacket and in his eyes. 



"One can never consent to creep 
When one feels the impulse to soar/ 7 

Helen Keller 



222 




223 




224 




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Todd Rosenbaum 
Elizabeth Homan 





■■■gH 






It makes all the difference whether one sees darkness through the 
light or brightness through the shadows." 

—David Lindsay 




REMEMBER YESTERDAY, DREAM OF TOMORROW, BUT LIVE FOR TODAY. 

On this final page of the 1984-1985 Golden Legend yearbook, I would like to acknowl- 
edge and give credit to a certain few, who gave their time and effort throughout the 
year. Alot of hard work went into this yearbook, and there are a few people I would like to 
thank. 

First and absolutely foremost, I would like to say to my co-editors, Christine Cunningham 
and Jami McLaughlin that you girls are great! I would like to thank you for your spirit, guts 
and determination: for putting up with me and my crazy ideas and for sticking it out till the 
very end, without you I wouldn't have made it. Although we have had some problems in 
the beginning, I think that in the end, we made a helluva great team, and I think this 
yearbook proves it. Again, thanks girls, you're the best. 

Next, I would like to thank Mr. Powers, on whom I could always count for an encourag- 
ing word and moral support; to Mr. Chester Taylor, who always asked how life in the 
"cubbyhole" was going; to my friends, especially Cat, Sophie, Rich, Ellen, Justine, Sue, 
Tasha, Art, and Chops, thanks for understanding, it means alot; to Alicia Hasiak, John 
Kaddouri, Doug Latino, and Katie "Scoop" Martin, thanks for the great photographs; a 
special thanks to Becky Calvert for having a wonderful smile, and for always giving me 
encouragement when life as an editor got too much to handle; an extra special thanks to 
T.J. for giving me a special memory, much luck and happiness to you. Again thanks to all 
my friends and faculty members who have helped me throughout the year. 

There is one more person I would like to give a big thank you to and that is Ms. Seppie Al- 
lan, my yearbook advisor, for believing in me and for her countless supply of encourage- 
ment and votes of confidence. She inspired me to go for it all, to strive for the very best 
and not hold back and for that I thank her. 

When I took this job, I never imagined how much hard work goes into a yearbook. A 
yearbook's purpose is to recall, in pictures, the events and people that made up the past 
year. With this idea Chris, Jami and myself wanted to fill this book with pictures that would 
bring back a flood of fantastic memories that showed all the great times and good 
friends at Leoland, and show us how we've grown. We strived for the very best. There- 
fore, there were alot of late nights, or should I say early mornings, alot of headaches, lost 
deadlines, mass confusion, and heartache. It was a stress filled job, where at times we all 
wanted to quit, but the three of us stuck it out for you. We all hope that the 1984-85 
Golden Legend is a yearbook that you will always treasure and when looked at ten years 
from now will still make you smile. 

To everyone, much luck, success and happiness in your future endeavors. 

Steven McGrath 



228 



A teacher once taught us that a necessary part of criticism is the ability to suggest a viable 
alternative to the problem in question. Of course, if you are seriously considering a departure from the 
status quo, you will probably be the one who must initiate change. It is one thing to cry, "The roof 
leaks!" and quite another to stand in tar repairing the roof as a hot afternoon sun blazes overhead. 

The same is true of yearbooks. So many times we have received suggestions and criticisms- 
positive and negative— which are rarely applicable. Thought and concern exist in these directions, but 
there is no energy to instigate a change. Those who were willing to cast their ideas in concrete were 
few this year, but this edition of the Golden Legend readily attests to the changes that were pushed 
into reality. We hope these improvements (for we see them as progressions) and precedents will 
encourage the imagination and creativity of future staffs, regardless of size or stature. 

The special people involved in this impulsive break from tradition indeed deserve recognition. 
... A flash of congratulations to the editors — Chris, Jami, and Steve— for having the insight to 
recognize which trends needed revision and which should remain intact . . . Thank you, Seppie Allan, 
for your support, ideas and for allowing the staff to explore new techniques and discard some old 
ones— your enthusiasm strengthened our impulse ... To those whose photographs appear in this 
book— Bob Burroughs, Jami McLaughlin, Chris Cunningham, Seppie Allan, Greg Cuke, Doug Latino, 
Katie Martin, Jim Powers, Alicia Hasiak, and John Kaddouri— special thanks for your talent, time, and 
effort ... A Broadway salute to Mr. Allan Powers, who extended us the opportunity to gain new insights 
and compare notes with the best. ... To Mr. Jim Cobb, our advisor from Herff Jones, who was close by 
and always reiterated, "Whatever you can dream, we can do" — thank you . . . Our appreciation to 
teachers, friends, parents, and everyone who offered help, suggestions, and advice— your encour- 
agement gave new meaning to the word "impulse." 

Christine Cunningham & Jami McLaughlin 

"Knowledge is never finished." 

Merlean-Ponty 




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This edition of the Saint Leo College Golden Legend was produced 
by the Golden Legend Yearbook Staff and published in conjunction 
with Herff Jones, Inc. of Montgomery, Alabama. The book contains 
232 pages printed using an off-set lithography process, of which 32 
pages (those involving a 4-color technique) were printed on 100 lb. 
Eurogloss paper, and 200 pages on 80 lb. Bordeaux. A custom Saint 
Leo Green was used on both the cover and spot color pages. The 
endsheets featured a spot Saint Leo Green and yellow ochre in 
addition to black. The cover was produced by a 4-color lithography 
process and involved custom artwork. The basic typestyle was 
Avant Garde Book and additional styles included Cloister, Bingham 
Script, Broadway, Brush Script, Mead Bold. Old English, Orbit, Spring, 
and Venetta. Photographs were taken mainly by staff photogra- 
phers and developed in the Golden Legend darkroom. Additional 
work was completed by Davis Studios of Longwood. Photographs 
were printed on Kodak and llford paper. 700 copies of the 1985 
Golden Legend were printed and each copy contained 14 1/2 
signatures. 

The photo above and enlarged on these pages: detail of the 
mosaic decorating a conference room in the United Nations building 
located in New York City. Photograph by Jami McLaughlin. 



229 



/ want to live forever — or die in the attempt. 

Hellei '/Catch-22 




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